No evidence that alcohol causes depression, study finds

September 12, 2013, University of Western Australia
alcohol

(Medical Xpress)—There is no truth to the long-held belief that alcohol causes depression, clinical neuroscientists from The University of Western Australia have concluded.

Professor Osvaldo Almeida, of UWA's School of Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, said that until now everyone had assumed that alcohol caused people to become depressed, particularly if consumed at excessive levels.

"Even one of the diagnoses we have for depressive disorders - Substance Induced Mood Disorder - is a diagnosis where alcohol plays a role," Professor Almeida said. "However, because of the observational nature of the association between alcohol and depression, and the risk of confounding and bias that comes with , it is difficult to be entirely certain that the relationship is causal.

"For example, people who drink too much may also smoke, have poor diets and other diseases that could explain the excess number of people with depression among ."

Professor Almeida and fellow researchers with the long-running Health in Men Study (HIMS) decided to search for a causal link via physiological pathways instead: specifically the genetic polymorphism, or mutation, most closely associated with alcohol metabolism.

"We now know that certain genetic variations affect the amount of alcohol people consume," Professor Almeida said. "There is one particular that affects the enzyme responsible for the metabolism of alcohol. This variation produces an enzyme that is up to 80 times less competent at breaking down alcohol. Consequently, people who carry this variation are much less tolerant to alcohol. In fact, there is now evidence that alcohol-related disorders are very uncommon in this group.

"Now, if alcohol causes depression, then a genetic variation that reduces alcohol use and alcohol-related disorders, should reduce the risk of depression. The great advantage of looking at the gene is that this association is not confounded by any other factors - people are born like that."

The researchers analysed the triangular association between the genetic mutation, alcohol and depression in 3873 elderly male participants of the HIMS study, using data collected over three to eight years.

"We found (as expected) that this particular genetic variant was associated with reduced alcohol use, but it had no association with depression whatsoever," Professor Almeida said.

"The conclusion is that alcohol use neither causes nor prevents depression in older men. Our results also debunk the view that mild to moderate alcohol consumption may reduce the risk of depression."

He said the association observed between alcohol and depression was likely explained by other factors, but not by alcohol itself.

"It doesn't mean alcohol is entirely safe and people can consume it in whatever way they like. We know that alcohol when consumed in excess does create a lot of health problems - but what we now know is that one of those problems is not depression."

HIMS is a longitudinal study of 12,201 men aged 65-83 when recruited in 1996. The HIMS research team, largely made up of UWA researchers, has so far published more than 100 papers on a wide range of men's health and ageing issues.

A paper on the study - The triangular association of ADH1B genetic polymorphism, consumption and the risk of in older men - was published this week in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, part of the Nature group.

Explore further: A wine a day associated with lower risk of depression

More information: www.nature.com/mp/journal/vaop … full/mp2013117a.html

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4 comments

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verkle
Sep 12, 2013
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
RobertKarlStonjek
1.5 / 5 (6) Sep 13, 2013
They should have asked some psychiatrists.

And not forgetting that the most depressed individuals never reach old age (the cohort was old men)...
RobertKarlStonjek
1 / 5 (5) Sep 13, 2013
From my Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology Group:
"Excessive alcohol reduces health, causes regret, effects the achievement of life goals, destroys relationships etc etc, all of these cause or aggravate depression.

The fact that the chemical has no direct causative effect is irrelevant. It is the behavioural effect that it has.

Saying that alcohol has no effect because of chemical reasoning is like saying that CBT has no effect because the mechanics of hearing a voice does not alter mood or that knowledge alone does not cause nor elevate depression.

It is the behaviour that CBT and alcohol effect that causes the effect. In both cases, the observed effects are secondary, not primary."
https://www.faceb...esearch/
Sinister1811
1 / 5 (2) Sep 16, 2013
From personal experience, alcohol helps with depression. Antidepressants do nothing, neither does exercise. It's when the effects wear off that it comes back again.

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