Depression may increase your risk of Parkinson's disease

October 2, 2013, American Academy of Neurology

People who are depressed may have triple the risk of developing Parkinson's disease, according to a study published in the October 2, 2013, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

"Depression is linked in other studies to illnesses such as cancer and stroke," said study author Albert C. Yang, MD, PhD, with Taipei Veterans General Hospital in Taipei, Taiwan. "Our study suggests that may also be an for Parkinson's disease."

Researchers analyzed the medical records of 4,634 people with depression and 18,544 free of depression over 10 years. They also looked at the risk of Parkinson's disease after excluding people who were diagnosed with Parkinson's disease within two or five years following their depression diagnosis.

During the 10-year follow-up period, 66 people with depression, or 1.42 percent, and 97 without depression, or 0.52 percent, were diagnosed with Parkinson's disease. People with depression were 3.24 times more likely to develop Parkinson's disease than those without depression.

"Many questions remain, including whether depression is an early symptom of Parkinson's disease rather than an independent risk factor for the disease," Yang said. "Our study also found that depression and older age and having difficult-to-treat depression were significant risk factors as well."

Explore further: Depression a key factor in health of Parkinson's patients: study

Related Stories

Depression a key factor in health of Parkinson's patients: study

November 28, 2012
(HealthDay)—Depression is the most important determinant of the health status of people with Parkinson's disease, according to early findings from a large study of Parkinson's patients.

Depressed stroke survivors may face triple the risk of death

January 11, 2013
People who are depressed after a stroke may have a tripled risk of dying early and four times the risk of death from stroke than people who have not experienced a stroke or depression, according to a study released today ...

Stopping cholesterol drugs may be associated with increased risk of Parkinson's

July 24, 2013
People who stop taking cholesterol drugs may be at an increased risk for developing Parkinson's disease, according to research that appears in the July 24, 2013, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American ...

Recommended for you

Parkinson's gene initiates disease outside of the brain

March 21, 2018
Until very recently, Parkinson's had been thought a disease that starts in the brain, destroying motion centers and resulting in the tremors and loss of movement. New research published this week in the journal Brain, shows ...

Faulty cellular membrane 'mix' linked to Parkinson's disease

March 15, 2018
Working with lab-grown human brain cells, Johns Hopkins researchers report they have uncovered a much sought-after connection between one of the most common genetic mutations in Parkinson's disease and the formation of fatty ...

Researchers uncover culprit in Parkinson's brain cell die-off

March 5, 2018
An estimated 10 million people worldwide are living with Parkinson's disease—an incurable neurodegenerative disorder that leads to an increasing loss of motor control.

Study uncovers cause of cell death in Parkinson's disease

February 26, 2018
A University of Guelph researcher has discovered one of the factors behind nerve cell death in Parkinson's disease, unlocking the potential for treatment to slow the progression of this fatal neurodegenerative disorder.

Protein levels in spinal fluid correlate to posture and gait difficulty in Parkinson's

February 21, 2018
Levels of a protein found in the brain called alpha-synuclein (α-syn) are significantly lower than normal in cerebrospinal fluid collected in Parkinson's disease patients suffering from postural instability and gait difficulty, ...

Calcium may play a role in the development of Parkinson's disease

February 19, 2018
Researchers have found that excess levels of calcium in brain cells may lead to the formation of toxic clusters that are the hallmark of Parkinson's disease.


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.