Race, ethnicity has no impact on long-term mortality in T2DM

October 25, 2013
Race/Ethnicity has no impact on long-term mortality in T2DM

(HealthDay)—For adults with type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease, race/ethnicity has no significant impact on the long-term risk of death, according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

As part of the Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes (BARI 2D) trial, Nirat Beohar, M.D., from Columbia University in Miami Beach, and colleagues examined the impact of race/ethnicity on control and on clinical outcomes in a setting with comparable access to medical care. A total of 1,750 adults with and from the United States and Canada were enrolled in the BARI 2D trial, and included 1,189 non-Hispanic whites, 349 non-Hispanic blacks, and 212 Hispanics. Participants were randomized to receive cardiac and glycemic treatment strategies.

During an average follow-up of 5.3 years, the researchers observed no significant variation by race/ethnicity in the long-term risk of death and death/myocardial infarction/stroke (five-year death: 11.0 percent whites; 13.7 percent blacks; 8.7 percent Hispanics; P = 0.19). For the 1,168 patients with suboptimal risk factor control at baseline, higher five-year survival was associated with the ability to attain better risk factor control (71, 86, and 95 percent, respectively, for patients with one, two, or three factors in control); this pattern was seen for all race/ethnicities.

"In conclusion, significant race/ethnic differences in cardiac risk profiles that persisted during follow-up did not translate into significant differences in five-year death or death/myocardial infarction/stroke," the authors write.

The BARI 2D Trial received funding, medications, and supplies from pharmaceutical companies.

Explore further: For patients with diabetes, angioplasty and bypass surgery lead to similar long-term benefits for quality of life

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

For patients with diabetes, angioplasty and bypass surgery lead to similar long-term benefits for quality of life

October 15, 2013
For patients with diabetes and coronary artery disease in more than one artery, treatment with coronary artery bypass graft surgery provided slightly better health status and quality of life between 6 months and 2 years than ...

Post-CABG risk of death increased for blacks with PAD

July 1, 2013
(HealthDay)—For patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), the risk of death is higher for those with peripheral artery disease (PAD), particularly for black versus white patients, according to a study ...

Low BMI is a risk factor for CVD in hypertensive patients with diabetes

September 3, 2013
Low BMI is a risk factor for CVD in hypertensive patients with diabetes, according to research presented at the ESC Congress today by Dr Takanori Nagahiro from Japan. The findings provide evidence for an obesity paradox in ...

New insight into reducing racial/ethnic disparities in diabetes

September 17, 2013
Despite higher rates of diabetes in black and Hispanic women, the rate at which women die of diabetes-related diseases such as cardiovascular disease and cancer is the same for all postmenopausal women, regardless of race ...

Racial disparity in diabetes mostly due to lifestyle

July 27, 2012
(HealthDay) -- For postmenopausal women there are large racial/ethnic differences in diabetes incidence, but these are mostly attributable to lifestyle factors, according to a study published online July 25 in Diabetes Care.

Whites more prone to certain heart condition than other ethnic groups

October 9, 2013
An individual's race or ethnic background could be a determining factor when it comes to risk of atrial fibrillation, the most frequently diagnosed type of irregular heart rhythm, according to researchers at UC San Francisco.

Recommended for you

A nanoparticle inhalant for treating heart disease

January 18, 2018
A team of researchers from Italy and Germany has developed a nanoparticle inhalant for treating people suffering from heart disease. In their paper published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, the group describes ...

Starting periods before age of 12 linked to heightened risk of heart disease and stroke

January 15, 2018
Starting periods early—before the age of 12—is linked to a heightened risk of heart disease and stroke in later life, suggests an analysis of data from the UK Biobank study, published online in the journal Heart.

'Decorated' stem cells could offer targeted heart repair

January 10, 2018
Although cardiac stem cell therapy is a promising treatment for heart attack patients, directing the cells to the site of an injury - and getting them to stay there - remains challenging. In a new pilot study using an animal ...

Two simple tests could help to pinpoint cause of stroke

January 10, 2018
Detecting the cause of the deadliest form of stroke could be improved by a simple blood test added alongside a routine brain scan, research suggests.

Exercise is good for the heart, high blood pressure is bad—researchers find out why

January 10, 2018
When the heart is put under stress during exercise, it is considered healthy. Yet stress due to high blood pressure is bad for the heart. Why? And is this always the case? Researchers of the German Centre for Cardiovascular ...

Heart-muscle patches made with human cells improve heart attack recovery

January 10, 2018
Large, human cardiac-muscle patches created in the lab have been tested, for the first time, on large animals in a heart attack model. This clinically relevant approach showed that the patches significantly improved recovery ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.