Low-voiced men love 'em and leave 'em, yet still attract more women, study says

October 16, 2013, McMaster University
This is an image of Jillian O'Connor, Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Pyschology, Neuroscience & Behaviour, McMaster University. Credit: McMaster University

Men with low-pitched voices have an advantage in attracting women, even though women know they're not likely to stick around for long.

Researchers at McMaster University have found that were more attracted to with masculine voices, at least for short-term relationships.

Those men were also seen as more likely to cheat and unsuitable for a longer relationship, such as marriage.

The study, published online in the journal Personality and Individual Differences, offers insight into the evolution of the and how we choose our mates.

"The sound of someone's voice can affect how we think of them," explains Jillian O'Connor, a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Psychology, Neuroscience & Behaviour and lead author of the study.

"Until now, it's been unclear why women would like the voices of men who might cheat. But we found that the more women thought these men would cheat, the more they were attracted to them for a brief relationship when they are less worried about fidelity."

For the study, 87 women listened to men's voices that were manipulated electronically to sound higher or lower, and then chose who they thought was more likely to cheat on their romantic partner.

Researchers also asked the participants to choose the voice they thought was more attractive for a long-term versus a short-term .

"From an evolutionary perspective, these perceptions of future sexual infidelity may be adaptive," explains David Feinberg, an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology, Neuroscience & Behaviour.

"The consequences of infidelity are very high whether it is emotional or financial and this research suggests that humans have evolved as a protection mechanism to avoid long-term partners who may cheat," he says.

Explore further: Our voices reveal relationship status and could be used to detect infidelity, study finds

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