Physicians should motivate and retain top employees

October 25, 2013
Physicians should motivate and retain top employees

(HealthDay)—Even in a time of declining reimbursements, smart employers should know how to motivate and retain superstar employees in their practice, according to an article published Oct. 10 in Medical Economics.

Judy Bee, from Performance Practice Group in La Jolla, Calif., notes that superstar employees do a great job, have the respect of coworkers, and are always reliable. They can only become superstars if their basic needs are met by having a good paycheck and fair working conditions. Superstars are motivated by higher-order needs, including the esteem of people they respect, a feeling of doing important well, and being part of an effective team. Job security, fair treatment, and are also important issues.

To retain current stars and help good workers become super, Bee recommends that employers recognize good work publicly, confer titles with respect and esteem, ask workers for help thinking through a practice problem, and ask superstars to mentor new employees. Employees with the potential to be a superstar should be paid near the top of the competitive market in addition to other creative benefits such as tuition assistance or paid time off.

"Superstars are hard to replace," Bee writes. "When you lose a star player you don't just lose their work value, you lose a great example for other and peace of mind from knowing your work is in good hands."

Explore further: Researcher finds that money motivates employees to lose weight

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