Thyroid project sheds light on molecular processes related to cystic fibrosis

October 29, 2013, Kansas State University
In addition to actively extracting I-, or iodide, from the circulation, thyroid follicular epithelial cells must also translocate I- into a central intrafollicular compartment, where it combines with thyroglobulin to form thyroid hormone precursor. Credit: Peying Fong

Research in the College of Veterinary Medicine at Kansas State University is leading to a better understanding of the molecular interactions in the thyroid gland related to cystic fibrosis.

A genetic disorder, affects the function of epithelia, the tissues formed of cells that secrete and absorb an array of substances important for health.

The university's Peying Fong, associate professor of anatomy and physiology, has received a $285,000 grant from the Department of Health and Human Services in support of her study, "CFTR Regulation of Thyroid Transport."

"We are looking at a cellular mechanism that is essential to production of thyroxine and triiodothyronine, which are hormones that modulate development, growth and metabolism in both prenatal and postnatal cell life," Fong said. "Iodide is an essential component of these . Its rarity in the environment challenges the thyroid to orchestrate a remarkable series of transport processes that are critical for hormone synthesis."

In addition to actively extracting iodidethrough the circulation process, thyroid cells must also translocate into a central compartment within thyroid follicles, where it begins to combine with thyroglobulin to form the precursor to thyroid hormone.

"Through this study, we are seeking to better understand the between the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator, or CFTR, and SLC5A8, which are two transport proteins found in thyroid," Fong said. "These proteins may play a role in moving iodide into the follicular lumen."

Fong's project is classified by the National Institutes of Health as an R15 Academic Research Enhancement Award. The NIH uses such awards to strengthen research environments at educational institutions as well as to promote the exposure of students to . This is a renewable grant and helps cover expenses for a period of up to three years.

Fong said that the groundwork for her research project originally began with funding from the Kansas State University's Center of Biomedical Research Excellence, or COBRE, and NIH project "Epithelial Function in Health and Disease"; a grant-in-aid from the American Heart Association Midwest Affiliate; and an Innovative Research Award from the university's Johnson Center for Basic Cancer Research.

Explore further: New recommendations for standardizing studies of thyroid hormone and disease from ATA taskforce

Related Stories

New recommendations for standardizing studies of thyroid hormone and disease from ATA taskforce

September 5, 2013
Despite tens of thousands of studies in the literature on the thyroid gland, thyroid hormone, and thyroid disease, lack of standardization in study design makes it difficult to compare the results and apply them to the development ...

Thyroid hormone plays a key part in the vascular regulation of body temperature

September 16, 2013
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have discovered a reason why people with disorders of the thyroid gland may be more sensitive to environmental temperature. According to the study, published in the Proceedings ...

Researchers generate thyroid tissue using mice stem cells

October 11, 2012
(Medical Xpress)—Researchers in Brussels, with assistance from U.S. colleagues, have succeeded in generating thyroid tissue using mice embryonic stem cells. A procedure involving grafting new tissue onto a disabled thyroid ...

Endocrine-disrupting chemicals may increase odds of women developing mild hypothyroidism

July 17, 2013
Exposure to perfluorinated chemicals is linked to changes in thyroid function and may raise the risk of mild hypothyroidism in women, according to a recent study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society's Journal ...

A new type of nerve cell found in the brain

December 21, 2012
Scientists at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, in collaboration with colleagues in Germany and the Netherlands, have identified a previously unknown group of nerve cells in the brain. The nerve cells regulate cardiovascular ...

Recommended for you

Forces from fluid in the developing lung play an essential role in organ development

January 23, 2018
It is a marvel of nature: during gestation, multiple tissue types cooperate in building the elegantly functional structures of organs, from the brain's folds to the heart's multiple chambers. A recent study by Princeton researchers ...

More surprises about blood development—and a possible lead for making lymphocytes

January 22, 2018
Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have long been regarded as the granddaddy of all blood cells. After we are born, these multipotent cells give rise to all our cell lineages: lymphoid, myeloid and erythroid cells. Hematologists ...

How metal scaffolds enhance the bone healing process

January 22, 2018
A new study shows how mechanically optimized constructs known as titanium-mesh scaffolds can optimize bone regeneration. The induction of bone regeneration is of importance when treating large bone defects. As demonstrated ...

Researchers illustrate how muscle growth inhibitor is activated, could aid in treating ALS

January 19, 2018
Researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine are part of an international team that has identified how the inactive or latent form of GDF8, a signaling protein also known as myostatin responsible for ...

Bioengineered soft microfibers improve T-cell production

January 18, 2018
T cells play a key role in the body's immune response against pathogens. As a new class of therapeutic approaches, T cells are being harnessed to fight cancer, promising more precise, longer-lasting mitigation than traditional, ...

Weight flux alters molecular profile, study finds

January 17, 2018
The human body undergoes dramatic changes during even short periods of weight gain and loss, according to a study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.