New study shows uterine fibroids have greater impact in African-American women

October 9, 2013, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc
©2013 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers

A national survey has found that uterine fibroids have a disproportionate impact on African American women, causing more severe symptoms, interfering with their daily life, and causing them to miss work. These new findings are reported in Journal of Women's Health.

African American women have a 3-fold higher incidence of uterine fibroids and tend to have them at an earlier age. In "The Burden of Uterine Fibroids for African American Women: Results of a National Survey," authors Elizabeth Stewart, MD, Wanda Nicholson, MD, MPH, MBA, Linda Bradley, MD, and Bijan Borah, PhD, Mayo Clinic and Mayo Medical School, Rochester, MN, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, and Cleveland Clinic, OH, describe the symptoms, concerns, and quality of life issues African American women are more likely to face than are other women with .

Early intervention to reduce the high risk of hysterectomy and preserve the fertility of this disproportionately affected group of women should be considered, proposes Gloria Richard-Davis, MD, University of Arkansas Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, in the accompanying Editorial, "Uterine Fibroid: The Burden Borne by African American Women."

"Uterine fibroids are a major source of morbidity for reproductive-aged women, and this is especially true for African American ," says Susan G. Kornstein, MD, Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Women's Health, Executive Director of the Virginia Commonwealth University Institute for Women's Health, Richmond, VA, and President of the Academy of Women's Health.

Explore further: Abuse during childhood linked to uterine fibroids in African-American women

More information: The article is available free on the Journal of Women's Health website at http://www.liebertpub.com/jwh.

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2 comments

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aakriti90feb
not rated yet Oct 26, 2013
but why is that African American women have higher chances of developing fibroids, is it all about their lifestyle?
sharing a link on uterine fibroids http://www.themed...567.html
deepaksharma01
not rated yet Nov 12, 2013
Yes the problem of uterine fibroid may interfere with normal health problems so it is better to for proper medical treatment

http://www.life-u...pted.com

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