Smaller belly, less deli may reduce kidney disease risk, study finds

November 1, 2013
Smaller belly, less deli may reduce kidney disease risk, study finds
Processed foods are usually high in harmful phosphorus additives.

(HealthDay)—Losing belly fat and limiting processed foods and other sources of dietary phosphorus might help reduce your risk of kidney disease, a new study finds.

Phosphorus is added to many to enhance their flavor and extend their shelf life. High levels of phosphorus are also naturally found in animal, dairy and vegetable proteins, said study leader Dr. Alex Chang, of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.

The study of nearly 500 overweight or obese adults enrolled in a healthy-lifestyle program found that a shrinking waistline and lower consumption of dietary phosphorus were associated with reduced levels of protein in the urine (albuminuria), which is an early sign of .

After six months, participants' waistlines shrunk an average of 1.7 inches and they had a 25 percent reduction in urine protein. The researchers also found that a 314-milligram reduction in phosphorus excretion resulted in an 11 percent decrease in urine protein.

The study appeared in the November issue of the American Journal of Kidney Diseases.

Other studies have suggested that weight loss may slow kidney disease progression, but this is the first research study to support losing belly fat and limiting phosphorus consumption as a possible way to prevent kidney disease from developing in the first place, Dr. Joseph Vassalotti, chief medical officer at the National Kidney Foundation, said in a foundation news release.

"A good rule of thumb is that if the food comes in a package, it's likely to be high in phosphorus," he said. "Approximately 90 percent of phosphorus additives are absorbed by the body."

To limit phosphorus consumption, look for the root letters "PHOS" on . But isn't always listed on food labels, Vassalotti said, so you need to know likely sources. They include:

  • Processed foods such as dark colas, cereals and flavored waters
  • Dairy products such as cheese, milk, cream, ice cream and yogurt
  • Animal protein such as deli meats, organ meats, meat tenderizers, oysters and sardines
  • Dried beans, lentils, peas, nuts and seeds (including peanut butter and other nut butters), cocoa (including chocolate-based drinks and puddings)

Explore further: Study questions safety and effectiveness of common kidney disease drugs

More information: The U.S. National Kidney Disease Education Program outlines how to keep your kidneys healthy.

Related Stories

Study questions safety and effectiveness of common kidney disease drugs

July 19, 2012
Drugs commonly prescribed to patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) may not be as strongly effective as once thought, and may cause unexpected harm to blood vessels, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue ...

Poor kidney response to hormone may increase risks for kidney disease patients

March 21, 2013
The kidneys' response to a particular hormone may affect kidney disease patients' heart health and longevity, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN). ...

Phosphate-binding drug does not improve heart health of patients with mild kidney disease

April 18, 2013
High phosphate levels in the blood carry increased heart-related risks, but taking a drug that targets phosphate does not improve cardiovascular measures in patients with mild kidney disease, according to a study appearing ...

Recommended for you

Research examines lung cell turnover as risk factor and target for treatment of influenza pneumonia

July 24, 2017
Influenza is a recurring global health threat that, according to the World Health Organization, is responsible for as many as 500,000 deaths every year, most due to influenza pneumonia, or viral pneumonia. Infection with ...

Scientists propose novel therapy to lessen risk of obesity-linked disease

July 24, 2017
With obesity related illnesses a global pandemic, researchers propose in the Journal of Clinical Investigation using a blood thinner to target molecular drivers of chronic metabolic inflammation in people eating high-fat ...

Raccoon roundworm—a hidden human parasite?

July 24, 2017
The raccoon that topples your trashcan and pillages your garden may leave more than just a mess. More likely than not, it also contaminates your yard with parasites—most notably, raccoon roundworms (Baylisascaris procyonis).

Google searches can be used to track dengue in underdeveloped countries

July 20, 2017
An analytical tool that combines Google search data with government-provided clinical data can quickly and accurately track dengue fever in less-developed countries, according to new research published in PLOS Computational ...

MRSA emerged years before methicillin was even discovered

July 19, 2017
Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) emerged long before the introduction of the antibiotic methicillin into clinical practice, according to a study published in the open access journal Genome Biology. It was ...

New test distinguishes Zika from similar viral infections

July 18, 2017
A new test is the best-to-date in differentiating Zika virus infections from infections caused by similar viruses. The antibody-based assay, developed by researchers at UC Berkeley and Humabs BioMed, a private biotechnology ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.