Earlier adiposity rebound linked to metabolic syndrome

Earlier adiposity rebound linked to metabolic syndrome

(HealthDay)—The age of adiposity rebound (AR), at which time body mass index (BMI) starts to rise after infancy, is associated with future development of metabolic syndrome, according to a study published online Dec. 23 in Pediatrics.

Satomi Koyama, M.D., Ph.D., from the Dokkyo Medical University in Tochigi, Japan, and colleagues examined whether the age of AR is related to future occurrence of . Serial measurements of BMI were collected for 271 children born in 1995 and 1996 at the ages of 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24 months and every year thereafter through age 12. The age of AR was calculated based on BMI measures; plasma lipids and blood pressure were assessed at age 12.

The researchers observed a correlation between earlier AR (before age 4) with higher BMI (≥20 kg/m²) and a lipoprotein phenotype indicating insulin resistance. This phenotype included elevated triglycerides, apolipoprotein B, and atherogenic index. In addition, the phenotype included decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in boys and elevated apolipoprotein B in girls at 12. In boys, earlier AR correlated with increased .

"Detection of early AR may permit identification of young children at risk for developing later metabolic syndrome and provide an opportunity for preventive intervention," the authors write.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the medical device and medical technology industries.


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Citation: Earlier adiposity rebound linked to metabolic syndrome (2013, December 26) retrieved 16 June 2021 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-12-earlier-adiposity-rebound-linked-metabolic.html
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