59 test positive for TB after Las Vegas outbreak

December 23, 2013 by Hannah Dreier

Las Vegas public health officials say dozens of people linked to a tuberculosis outbreak at a neonatal unit have tested positive for the disease.

The Southern Nevada Health District reported on Monday that of the 977 people tested, 59 showed indications of the disease and two showed signs of being contagious.

Dr. Joe Iser, chief medical officer at the health district, says the report demonstrates the importance of catching tuberculosis early.

Health officials tested hundreds of babies, and staff who were at Summerlin Hospital Medical Center's neonatal intensive care unit this past summer, saying they wanted to take extra precautions after the death of a mother and her twin babies.

They contacted the parents of about 140 babies who were at the unit between mid-May and mid-August.

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