Docs prefer tablets over smartphones for reading articles

January 30, 2014
Docs prefer tablets over smartphones for reading articles

(HealthDay)—Although physicians generally use smartphones rather than tablets for professional purposes, they are more likely to read articles from medical publications and access medically oriented webcasts/podcasts on tablets, according to the results of a survey conducted by Kantar Media.

Researchers surveyed more than 3,000 across 22 specialties to examine their online and mobile activities, e-detailing experience, and exposure to , including traditional and emerging media.

According to the report, about half of physicians (51 percent) use a tablet for professional purposes. Of those surveyed, 49 percent use a tablet for professional and personal purposes; 19 percent only for personal use; and 2 percent only for professional use. More physicians use smartphones for professional purposes overall than use tablets. Twenty-eight percent of physicians use tablets to read articles from medical publications, compared with 21 percent who use smartphones. More physicians use tablets than smartphones to access medically oriented webcasts and podcasts (16 versus 12 percent).

"Overall, more doctors are using smartphones for professional purposes than tablets, but there are a small number of tasks that they are more likely to perform on a ," according to a Kantar Media press release.

Explore further: Smartphones, smartphone apps increasingly used by docs

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