High uric acid level linked to coronary stent restenosis

January 10, 2014

(HealthDay)—A high level of serum uric acid prior to implantation of bare-metal coronary stents predicts stent restenosis, according to research published in the Jan. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Osman Turak, M.D., of the Turkiye Yuksek Ihtisas Training and Research Hospital in Ankara, Turkey, and colleagues analyzed data from 708 consecutive patients (mean age, 60.3 ± 9.3 years; 71 percent men) with stable or unstable angina pectoris who received bare-metal coronary stents. The authors sought to assess the association between serum uric acid (SUA) level and in-stent restenosis (ISR).

The researchers found that, among patients grouped by tertiles according to preprocedural SUA level, stent restenosis occurred in 23 percent in the lowest tertile, 34 percent in the middle tertile, and 46 percent in the highest tertile. Independent predictors of ISR identified by multiple logistic regression analysis included diabetes mellitus, smoking, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, stent length, C-reactive protein level, and preprocedural SUA level. Further analysis showed that SUA level greater than 5.5 mg/dL had 75 percent sensitivity and 71 percent specificity in predicting ISR.

"In conclusion, higher preprocedural SUA is a powerful and independent predictor of bare-metal stent restenosis in with stable and unstable angina pectoris," the authors write.

Explore further: Procedural results from the RIBS V trial presented

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