Medical staff performance goals should be clear, attainable

January 24, 2014
Medical staff performance goals should be clear, attainable

(HealthDay)—Staff performance in medical practices needs to be appropriately managed and measured with performance goals, according to an article published Dec. 25 in Medical Economics.

Keith Borglum, C.H.B.C., a practice management consultant from Professional Management and Marketing in Santa Rosa, Calif., offers some tips for reviewing employees' performances and determining when raises are appropriate.

Borglum says that, first, setting clearly defined goals is necessary for managers and staff. He says that goals should be "challenging yet attainable, clear and unambiguous, written and measurable." Additionally, the draft goals should be discussed at a staff meeting. After agreement of the goals, staff achievement and compliance needs to be managed. This should involve some form of checklist and grading of . Lastly, performance needs to be rewarded both through raises, when appropriate, and public praise. Reprimanding staff should always be done privately.

"Having employees is like having diabetes. There is no cure, only management," Borglum writes, quoting one of his favorite human resources sayings.

Explore further: Toxic employees are damaging to medical practices

More information: Full Article

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