A third of a million people now diagnosed with cancer every year

January 14, 2014, Cancer Research UK

(Medical Xpress)—The number of people being diagnosed with cancer in the UK each year has hit more than 330,000 for the first time, according to the latest figures published by Cancer Research UK today.

While more people than ever are being diagnosed with cancer, research has led to more people surviving the disease. Survival has doubled in the last 40 years thanks to improvements in the prevention, diagnosis and .

In 2001 there were around 283,000 cases diagnosed which means there has been an increase of nearly 50,000 over 10 years.

The main reason for the increase in cases is the ageing population. As there are more people living longer, more will develop the disease.

The figures are published as Cancer Research UK continues its campaign to raise awareness of the importance of research in beating cancer and reducing its devastating impact.

Overall rates of people being diagnosed with cancer have climbed by a more than a third (35 per cent) between 1975 and 2011. In 1975, around 295 per 100,000 were diagnosed with the disease. This increased to almost 400 per 100,000 in 2011. This increase is partly because of such as drinking alcohol and being overweight.

Research has helped to improve the outcome for many. In the 1970s 23 per cent of survived ten years. This climbed to around 46 per cent in 2007.

Lorna Ross, 57, from London was 51 when a scan picked up the fact she had . Her sons James and William were just 15 and 10 when she got the devastating news in October 2007. After surgery Lorna had four weeks of radiotherapy followed by a course of tamoxifen - a drug that Cancer Research UK helped to show the benefits of. Lorna has now finished her treatment and continues to have mammograms every three years.

Lorna said: "The cancer was so small, a tiny invasive growth. It wouldn't have been picked up for many months or possibly years. The most difficult thing was telling the boys. My first thought was - 'Oh God I want to see them grow up.' It's tricky because I didn't want to worry them with terrible news. My life was on hold while I began treatment and learnt what was going to happen. Thanks to the treatment and the team who looked after me, my family and I have been able to return to a regular life. Research saves lives, and it was research that developed the drugs that helped me beat cancer."

Dr Harpal Kumar, Cancer Research UK's chief executive, said: "These figures reinforce the vital need for more research to better prevent, treat and cure cancer. As the population ages, more people than ever before will be told: 'you have cancer'. Research is the only way we'll be able to reduce the devastating impact of the disease. One day we will beat . The more research we do, the sooner that day will come."

Explore further: Deaths from oesophageal cancer up by almost 50 per cent in last 40 years

Related Stories

Deaths from oesophageal cancer up by almost 50 per cent in last 40 years

January 6, 2014
The number of people dying from oesophageal cancer – cancer of the gullet or food pipe – has risen by 49 per cent in the last 40 years according to new figures published by Cancer Research UK, today.

Cancer death rates drop by 20 per cent over 20 years

December 18, 2013
The death rate from cancer has dropped by more than a fifth since the 1990s according to the latest Cancer Research UK analysis released today (Wednesday).

Nearly all men survive testicular cancer

July 29, 2013
Survival for testicular cancer has risen by almost 30 per cent in the last 40 years, with nearly all men now beating the disease, according to figures published by Cancer Research UK.

Eight in 10 now survive skin cancer

July 22, 2013
(Medical Xpress)—More than eight out of 10 people diagnosed with malignant melanoma, the most dangerous form of skin cancer, will now survive the disease, compared to only around five in 10 in the early 70s, according to ...

Early trip to the GP gives big boost to lung cancer patients

December 9, 2013
A powerful campaign urging people with a three week old cough to get checked out by their doctor has resulted in a dramatic rise in the number of lung cancers detected earlier according to an analysis of the results announced ...

Study highlights varying cancer survival rates across Europe

December 13, 2013
Cancer survival rates are continuing to improve in England, according to the results from a Europe-wide collaborative project.

Recommended for you

T-cells engineered to outsmart tumors induce clinical responses in relapsed Hodgkin lymphoma

January 16, 2018
WASHINGTON-(Jan. 16, 2018)-Tumors have come up with ingenious strategies that enable them to evade detection and destruction by the immune system. So, a research team that includes Children's National Health System clinician-researchers ...

Researchers identify new treatment target for melanoma

January 16, 2018
Researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have identified a new therapeutic target for the treatment of melanoma. For decades, research has associated female sex and a history of previous ...

More evidence of link between severe gum disease and cancer risk

January 16, 2018
Data collected during a long-term health study provides additional evidence for a link between increased risk of cancer in individuals with advanced gum disease, according to a new collaborative study led by epidemiologists ...

Researchers develop a remote-controlled cancer immunotherapy system

January 15, 2018
A team of researchers has developed an ultrasound-based system that can non-invasively and remotely control genetic processes in live immune T cells so that they recognize and kill cancer cells.

Dietary fat, changes in fat metabolism may promote prostate cancer metastasis

January 15, 2018
Prostate tumors tend to be what scientists call "indolent" - so slow-growing and self-contained that many affected men die with prostate cancer, not of it. But for the percentage of men whose prostate tumors metastasize, ...

Pancreatic tumors may require a one-two-three punch

January 15, 2018
One of the many difficult things about pancreatic cancer is that tumors are resistant to most treatments because of their unique density and cell composition. However, in a new Wilmot Cancer Institute study, scientists discovered ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.