MRSA drug dosage calculations found to be inaccurate for children over 10

January 7, 2014

The emergence of MRSA (Staphylococcus aureus), dubbed a 'superbug' due to its resistance to many antibiotic drugs, has resulted in the glycopeptide antibiotic Vancomycin being commonly prescribed for patients in hospital.

However, MRSA's resistance to drugs has led to concerns of a 'creeping minimum' in the concentration of the dosage required to treat infection. In , nomograms are used to calculate the correct dosage of Vancomycin based on a patient's weight and creatinine levels.

While these adult nomograms are widely thought to be suitable for teenagers, pharmacological differences between teens and young adults remain poorly understood.

New research, published in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, explores the accuracy of adult nomograms in children over ten. The results of 120 patients from a children's' hospital in Vanderbilt, Nashville, revealed that Vancomycin nomograms from adults were not accurate in predicting appropriate dosing levels in .

"Based on the variability of pharmacokinetic parameters and drug clearance, the two Vancomycin nomograms developed to predict therapeutic Vancomycin concentrations in healthy adults did not accurately estimate dosage regimens in older children regardless of weight or age, and therefore should not be used to aid empiric dosing," said Dr. Jessica Gillon. "Further prospective studies are warranted for teens between 10 and 18 years of age to determine the most appropriate Vancomycin dosing to maximize drug efficacy and reduce the risk of Vancomycin induced renal toxicity."

Explore further: Vancomycin powder doesn't cut infection post-spine surgery

More information: Jessica E. Gillon, James E. Cassat, M. Cecilia Di Pentima, 'Validation of two vancomycin nomograms in patients 10 years of age and older' The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, Wiley, DOI: 10.1002/jcph.173

Related Stories

Vancomycin powder doesn't cut infection post-spine surgery

December 10, 2013
(HealthDay)—For patients undergoing spinal procedures, the local application of vancomycin powder in surgical wounds does not significantly reduce the incidence of infection, according to a study published in the Dec. 1 ...

New antibiotic shows promise for treating MRSA pneumonia

September 11, 2013
A drug approved just two years ago for treating bacterial infections may hold promise for treating the potentially fatal MRSA pneumonia, according to a Henry Ford Hospital study.

Less commonly prescribed antibiotic may be better

August 16, 2012
The antibiotic most commonly prescribed to treat bloodstream infections in dialysis patients may not always be the best choice, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of ...

Vibativ approved for certain bacterial pneumonia

June 24, 2013
(HealthDay)—The antibiotic Vibativ (telavancin) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat pneumonia caused by Staphylococcus aureus bacteria when other treatments aren't suitable.

How one strain of MRSA becomes resistant to last-line antibiotic

May 22, 2012
Researchers have uncovered what makes one particular strain of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) so proficient at picking up resistance genes, such as the one that makes it resistant to vancomycin, the last ...

Antibiotic linezolid an effective option for treating patients with MRSA infection

May 16, 2011
The antibiotic linezolid may be more effective than vancomycin in treating ventilated patients who develop methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) pneumonia as a result of their ventilation, according to a study ...

Recommended for you

Study suggests ending opioid epidemic will take years

July 20, 2017
The question of how to stem the nation's opioid epidemic now has a major detailed response. A new study chaired by University of Virginia School of Law Professor Richard Bonnie provides extensive recommendations for curbing ...

Team-based model reduces prescription opioid use among patients with chronic pain by 40 percent

July 17, 2017
A new, team-based, primary care model is decreasing prescription opioid use among patients with chronic pain by 40 percent, according to a new study out of Boston Medical Center's Grayken Center for Addiction Medicine, which ...

Private clinics' peddling of unproven stem cell treatments is unsafe and unethical

July 7, 2017
Stem cell science is an area of medical research that continues to offer great promise. But as this week's paper in Science Translational Medicine highlights, a growing number of clinics around the globe, including in Australia, ...

Popular heartburn drugs linked to higher death risk

July 4, 2017
Popular heartburn drugs called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been linked to a variety of health problems, including serious kidney damage, bone fractures and dementia. Now, a new study from Washington University School ...

Most reproductive-age women using opioids also use another substance

June 30, 2017
The majority of reproductive-age and pregnant women who use opioids for non-medical purposes also use at least one other substance, ranging from nicotine or alcohol to cocaine, according to a University of Pittsburgh Graduate ...

At-risk chronic pain patients taper opioids successfully with psychological tools

June 28, 2017
Psychological support and new coping skills are helping patients at high risk of developing chronic pain and long-term, high-dose opioid use taper their opioids and rebuild their lives with activities that are meaningful ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.