Poor sleep, fatigue linked to clinical-decision regret in nurses

January 5, 2014
Poor sleep, fatigue linked to clinical-decision regret in nurses
Among critical care nurses, clinical-decision regret is associated with sleep disturbances and the resulting fatigue, according to a study published in the January issue of the American Journal of Critical Care.

(HealthDay)—Among critical care nurses, clinical-decision regret is associated with sleep disturbances and the resulting fatigue, according to a study published in the January issue of the American Journal of Critical Care.

Linda D. Scott, R.N., Ph.D., from the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Nursing, and colleagues examined the correlation between selected sleep variables, fatigue-related impairment, and clinical-decision self-efficacy and regret in a cohort of 605 critical care nurses.

The researchers found that 29 percent of the nurses reported decision regret. Compared to those without decision regret, those with decision regret also reported more fatigue, more , less intershift recovery, and worse sleep quality. Significant associations were seen for male gender, working a 12-hour shift, and clinical-decision satisfaction with decision regret (C statistic, 0.719).

"Critical care nurses who experience impairments due to fatigue, , and inability to recover between shifts are more likely than unimpaired nurses to report clinical-decision regret," the authors write.

Explore further: Decision aid reduces conflict in breast cancer treatment

More information: Abstract
Full Text

Related Stories

Decision aid reduces conflict in breast cancer treatment

July 19, 2013
(HealthDay)—Chinese women considering surgery for breast cancer have less decisional conflict and subsequent regret if they receive an educational take-home booklet to involve them in decision making, according to a study ...

Regret when keeping sexual assault a secret

April 12, 2012
(Medical Xpress) -- According to the 2006 National Violence Against Women Survey, one in six women is a victim of sexual assault, a crime that Carol Anne Marchetti said is committed repeatedly by a relatively few number of ...

New decision aid for treatment of herniated disc beneficial

August 23, 2012
(HealthDay)—A new patient decision instrument meets the criteria of acceptability, reliability, and validity, and improves the quality of patient decision-making for treatment of a herniated disc, according to a study published ...

Recommended for you

Synthetic cannabinoid reduces sleep apnea

November 29, 2017
A synthetic version of a molecule found in the cannabis plant was safe and effective in treating obstructive sleep apnea in the first large, multi-site study of a drug for the sleep disorder funded by the National Institutes ...

Sleeping through the snoring: Researchers identify neurons that rouse the brain to breathe

November 2, 2017
A common and potentially serious sleep disorder, obstructive sleep apnea affects at least one quarter of U.S. adults and is linked to increased risk of diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular disease. In a paper published today ...

Remede system approved for sleep apnea

October 9, 2017
(HealthDay)—The Remede sleep system, an implanted device that treats central sleep apnea by activating a nerve that sends signals to the diaphragm to stimulate breathing, has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Inflammation may precede sleep apnea, could be treatment target

September 1, 2017
Inflammation is traditionally thought of as a symptom of sleep apnea, but it might actually precede the disorder, potentially opening the door for new ways to treat and predict sleep apnea, according to researchers.

More evidence: Untreated sleep apnea shown to raise metabolic and cardiovascular stress

August 31, 2017
Sleep apnea, left untreated for even a few days, can increase blood sugar and fat levels, stress hormones and blood pressure, according to a new study of sleeping subjects. A report of the study's findings, published in the ...

Sleep patterns contribute to racial differences in disease risk

August 18, 2017
Poor sleep patterns could explain, in part, the differences in the risk of cardiometabolic disease between African-Americans and European-Americans, according to a new study published in Proceedings of the National Academy ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.