Sealant gel approved for eye surgery

January 10, 2014

(HealthDay)—A sealant gel to prevent fluid leakage after cataract surgery has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

While gels such as ReSure have been approved to seal small incisions in other parts of the body, this is the first such approval for the eye, the agency said in a news release.

A cataract is a gradual clouding of the eye's lens. By age 80, more than half of Americans have either an active cataract or have had , the U.S. National Institutes of Health estimates.

The ReSure Sealant kit includes two liquid solutions that are mixed together just before use. The product is designed to seal an eye incision within 20 seconds of application, the FDA said. The gel then breaks down over seven days and is naturally flushed away by the eye's tears.

No serious to the gel were reported, the FDA said.

Before this approval, stitches were the only option for closing a leaking corneal after cataract surgery, the agency said. The product was evaluated in a clinical study of 471 adults.

The ReSure sealant is produced by Ocular Therapeutix, based in Bedford, Mass.

Explore further: Glaucoma stent approved

More information: The U.S. National Library of Medicine has more about cataracts.

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