Scientists explore promising new option for first line of attack in lymphoma

February 25, 2014

Follicular lymphoma is a type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma– a blood cancer - that usually develops slowly. The majority of patients are diagnosed when their disease is at an advanced stage.

Recent improvements in treatment have included the use of antibodies to specifically target the and to stimulate the patient's own immune system to attack their tumour. The use of such antibodies has improved treatment response, but unfortunately most patients still relapse.

Radioimmunotherapy – where a is attached to the antibody – has been shown to be successful in treating patients who had previously relapsed.

Now a team involving researchers from The University of Manchester – part of the Manchester Cancer Research Centre - has investigated the use of radioimmunotherapy treatment in newly diagnosed patients.

The study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, looked at the effect of delivering the treatment in two fractions or doses – this approach is thought to improve the penetration of the drug within larger tumours and also helps reduce the side effects associated with a full dose treatment.

Professor Tim Illidge, who led the research, said: "This was the first study to look at giving two fractions of radioimmunotherapy as an initial treatment in . We wanted to assess its safety and effectiveness in a group of high-risk patients who conventionally have done less well."

The researchers found that that their treatment plan was feasible and safe, with very few side effects.

"We saw a high overall response rate, of 94.4%, and 50 of the 72 (69.4%) patients treated in the study achieved complete response – meaning their symptoms disappeared. These results are encouraging, but we need further studies in larger numbers of patients to fully compare this treatment to the standard treatment of 6-8 cycles of chemotherapy," added Professor Illidge.

Explore further: Cancer Research UK launches trial of new lymphoma treatment

Related Stories

Cancer Research UK launches trial of new lymphoma treatment

January 29, 2014
Cancer Research UK's Drug Development Office (DDO) has launched a new clinical trial to treat lymphoma patients using the body's own immune system to attack cancerous B-cells growing out of control.

Genetic profiling tracks progression from manageable blood cancer into deadly disease

December 23, 2013
Genetic profiling has painted the clearest picture yet of how a type of blood cancer – follicular lymphoma – develops and changes from a manageable disease into an aggressive cancer, offering new targets for treatment, ...

Radioimmunotherapy could extend lives of advanced lymphoma patients

June 11, 2013
A new patient protocol for aggressive and recurrent lymphoma that combines intensive chemotherapy and radioimmunotherapy (RIT) may become the most powerful cancer-killing therapy available, with the hope that patients' lymphoma ...

Oxygen levels in tumours affect response to treatment

November 7, 2013
(Medical Xpress)—The genetic make-up of a patient's tumour could be used to personalise their treatment, and help to decide whether they would benefit from receiving additional drugs as part of their radiotherapy programme, ...

Targeted treatment is better than chemotherapy in some lung cancer patients

January 13, 2014
(Medical Xpress)—Patients with lung cancer who also have a specific gene rearrangement do better on a new targeted therapy compared with standard chemotherapy, according a study by University of Manchester scientists.

Targeted antibody, immune checkpoint blocker rein in follicular lymphoma

December 11, 2013
One drug attacks tumor cells directly, the other treats the immune system by taking the brakes off T cell response. Together, they put half of the patients with relapsed follicular lymphoma into complete remission in a phase ...

Recommended for you

Lung cancer triggers pulmonary hypertension

November 17, 2017
Shortness of breath and respiratory distress often increase the suffering of advanced-stage lung cancer patients. These symptoms can be triggered by pulmonary hypertension, as scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Heart ...

Researchers discover an Achilles heel in a lethal leukemia

November 16, 2017
Researchers have discovered how a linkage between two proteins in acute myeloid leukemia enables cancer cells to resist chemotherapy and showed that disrupting the linkage could render the cells vulnerable to treatment. St. ...

Computer program finds new uses for old drugs

November 16, 2017
Researchers at the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have developed a computer program to find new indications for old drugs. The computer program, called DrugPredict, ...

Pharmacoscopy improves therapy for relapsed blood cancer in a first clinical trial

November 16, 2017
Researchers at CeMM and the Medical University of Vienna presented a preliminary report in The Lancet Hematology on the clinical impact of an integrated ex vivo approach called pharmacoscopy. The procedures measure single-cell ...

Wider sampling of tumor tissues may guide drug choice, improve outcomes

November 15, 2017
A new study focused on describing genetic variations within a primary tumor, differences between the primary and a metastatic branch of that tumor, and additional diversity found in tumor DNA in the blood stream could help ...

A new strategy for prevention of liver cancer development

November 14, 2017
Primary liver cancer is now the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, and its incidences and mortality are increasing rapidly in the United Stated. In late stages of the malignancy, there are no effective ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.