Stressful compensation claims contribute to poor recovery after injury

February 13, 2014, Monash University
Stressful compensation claims contribute to poor recovery after injury
Experienced stressful claims had greater levels of anxiety, depression and disability.

(Medical Xpress)—Compensation claimants who have stressful claims recover more slowly than those who have less stressful experiences, a Monash-led study has found.

The study investigated stressful aspects of transport accident or workers' compensation claims, and the impact of that on long-term recovery.

It found those who had experienced stressful claims had greater levels of anxiety, depression and disability and a slower recovery from injury,

The study tracked the experiences of 332 injury patients from across Victoria, South Australia and New South Wales who were hospitalised with injuries between 2004 and 2006, and went on to claim compensation.

Six years after their injuries, some of the major sources of stress reported were, understanding what needed to be done for a claim, claim processing times and the number of medical assessments required.

Lead author Dr Genevieve Grant, Monash University Faculty of Law, said the results from the study indicated a need to consider how stress can be minimised in claims processes.

"Reducing the stress claimants experience in claims processes has the potential to help to improve their recovery, and result in better outcomes", Dr Grant said.

"Ways to do this might include taking steps to minimise claim delays and enhance claimants' access to information about the process and their entitlements."

The study was conducted in collaboration with researchers at the University of Melbourne and Stanford University.

For the complete list of recommendations and to access the full report, visit JAMA Psychiatry.

Explore further: The experiences of injured persons in compensation systems

More information: Grant GM, O'Donnell ML, Spittal MJ, Creamer M, Studdert DM. "Relationship Between Stressfulness of Claiming for Injury Compensation and Long-term Recovery: A Prospective Cohort Study." JAMA Psychiatry. 2014;():. DOI: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2013.4023.

Related Stories

The experiences of injured persons in compensation systems

September 18, 2013
The findings of three studies offering important insights into compensation systems and injured people will be presented at a research symposium in Melbourne this week.

Hairdressers reluctant to claim workers comp, study finds

December 12, 2012
A large number of hairdressers do not claim workers compensation for occupational contact dermatitis, according to a recent study.

Cost of road trauma falls

January 22, 2014
The cost of major trauma from road traffic injury and death has fallen over the last decade with the introduction of an integrated trauma system in Victoria, a new study has shown.

Is bigger really better when it comes to size of labor wards?

September 9, 2013
those handling 3,000 to 3,999 deliveries annually—have better overall approval rates compared to small, intermediate or very large obstetric units. The study, appearing in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ...

White construction workers in Illinois get higher workers' comp settlements, study finds

October 12, 2012
White non-Hispanic construction workers are awarded higher workers' compensation settlements in Illinois than Hispanic or black construction workers with similar injuries and disabilities, according to researchers at the ...

Recommended for you

Intensive behavior therapy no better than conventional support in treating teenagers with antisocial behavior

January 19, 2018
Research led by UCL has found that intensive and costly multisystemic therapy is no better than conventional therapy in treating teenagers with moderate to severe antisocial behaviour.

Babies' babbling betters brains, language

January 18, 2018
Babies are adept at getting what they need - including an education. New research shows that babies organize mothers' verbal responses, which promotes more effective language instruction, and infant babbling is the key.

College branding makes beer more salient to underage students

January 18, 2018
In recent years, major beer companies have tried to capitalize on the salience of students' university affiliations, unveiling marketing campaigns and products—such as "fan cans," store displays, and billboard ads—that ...

Inherited IQ can increase in early childhood

January 18, 2018
When it comes to intelligence, environment and education matter – more than we think.

Baby brains help infants figure it out before they try it out

January 17, 2018
Babies often amaze their parents when they seemingly learn new skills overnight—how to walk, for example. But their brains were probably prepping for those tasks long before their first steps occurred, according to researchers.

Reducing sessions of trauma-focused psychotherapy does not affect effectiveness

January 17, 2018
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) patients treated with as few as five sessions of trauma-focused psychotherapy find it equally effective as receiving 12 sessions.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.