For a sugar-free Valentine's day...

February 14, 2014
For a sugar-free valentine's day...
Here are some alternative gifts for a loved one with diabetes.

(HealthDay)—If your loved one has diabetes, go easy on the Valentine's Day candy, the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists advises.

For the 25.8 million adults in the United States with , Valentine's Day sweets could cause an unhealthy spike in , according to the association.

Rather than loading up on sweets, the group's physicians recommend a small package of handmade truffles for diabetics who can safely work a bit of sugar into their diet. Chocolate, they said, is metabolized more slowly than other types of and won't increase blood sugar levels as quickly.

Also, by learning about diabetes and thinking ahead, there are other ways you can show your love for someone with diabetes on Valentine's Day, the association said, including:

  • Opt for low-carb candy. Some candy makers have low-carbohydrate versions of popular Valentine's Day gifts. Still, it's a good idea to limit portion sizes of these candies. Although many are labeled "sugar-free," they have calories that affect blood sugar levels differently.
  • Be mindful of "hidden carbs." Aside from sugar, ingredients that can cause blood sugar levels to rise quickly include potatoes, white rice and . Just because a baked good is made with a sugar substitute doesn't mean it's an appropriate gift. Desserts that contain white flour, dried fruit, honey, corn syrup and agave nectar are not a good choice for people with diabetes.
  • Be creative and cook. Instead of offering a box of candy, one way you can show your love to a person who has diabetes is to prepare a home-cooked meal. This way you can offer them a meal that is sure to meet their dietary restrictions.

Explore further: Smartphone apps for diabetes: Do they really work?

More information: The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provides more Valentine's Day health tips.

Related Stories

Smartphone apps for diabetes: Do they really work?

January 29, 2014
(HealthDay)—Managing diabetes requires a great deal of time, memory and math skills. There are carbohydrates to count, medication doses to calculate and blood sugar levels to track.

Scientists create candy that's good for teeth

December 3, 2013
(Medical Xpress)—Dentists warn us that too many sweets can cause cavities. In fact, it's not candy, but bacteria on the tooth surface that cause tooth decay. If you reduce the amount of cavity-causing bacteria, the number ...

Blood sugar monitoring system approved for children

February 4, 2014
(HealthDay)—U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval of the Dexcom G4 Platinum Continuous Monitoring System has been expanded to include children with diabetes aged 2 years to 17 years, the agency said.

Sugar-sweetened beverage consumption increases endometrial cancer risk

November 22, 2013
Postmenopausal women who consumed sugar-sweetened beverages were more likely to develop the most common type of endometrial cancer compared with women who did not drink sugar-sweetened beverages, according to a study published ...

Diabetic kids can still enjoy Christmas treats if parents take special care

December 11, 2013
Indulgences abound during the holidays—from family gatherings to parties with friends and even stockings stuffed with goodies from Santa. For children with diabetes, overindulging on the delicacies of the season could result ...

Recommended for you

Alzheimer's drug cuts hallmark inflammation related to metabolic syndrome by 25 percent

July 20, 2017
An existing Alzheimer's medication slashes inflammation and insulin resistance in patients with metabolic syndrome, a potential therapeutic intervention for a highly dangerous condition affecting 30 percent of adults in the ...

Diabetes or its precursor affects 100 million Americans

July 19, 2017
Almost one-third of the US population—100 million people—either has diabetes or its precursor condition, known as pre-diabetes, said a government report Tuesday.

One virus may protect against type 1 diabetes, others may increase risk

July 11, 2017
Doctors can't predict who will develop type 1 diabetes, a chronic autoimmune disease in which the immune system destroys the cells needed to control blood-sugar levels, requiring daily insulin injections and continual monitoring.

Diabetes complications are a risk factor for repeat hospitalizations, study shows

July 7, 2017
For patients with diabetes, one reason for hospitalization and unplanned hospital readmission is severe dysglycemia (uncontrolled hyperglycemia - high blood sugar, or hypoglycemia - low blood sugar), says new research published ...

Researchers identify promising target to protect bone in patients with diabetes

July 7, 2017
Utilizing metabolomics research techniques, NYU Dentistry researchers investigated the underlying biochemical activity and signaling within the bone marrow of hyperglycemic mice with hopes of reducing fracture risks of diabetics

Immune system killer cells increase risk of diabetes

July 6, 2017
More than half of the German population is obese. One effect of obesity is to chronically activate the immune system, placing it under continuous stress. Researchers in Jens Brüning's team at the Max-Planck-Institute for ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.