AAO: Americans need to be more aware of UV-related eye health

May 2, 2014
AAO: americans need to be more aware of UV-related eye health

(HealthDay)—Americans need to be more aware of the increased vulnerability to ultraviolet (UV)-related eye disease associated with common medications and light-colored eyes, according to a report published by the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO).

The AAO commissioned a national Harris poll of more than 2,000 adults to examine how much Americans know about eye health risks posed by UV rays and protection measures commonly employed.

According to the report, one-third of adults use medications that may increase photosensitivity or increase susceptibility to UV ray damage, but about half (49 percent) were unaware or did not believe the photosensitivity risk associated with these medications. Most did not know that some birth control and estrogen pills could increase vulnerability to UV rays (86 percent) or that anti-inflammatory pain relievers have been associated with photosensitivity (83 percent). Almost three-quarters (72 percent) did not believe that antibiotics could cause photosensitivity. Although 54 percent of Americans have light-colored eyes, only 32 percent of those with light eyes and 29 percent overall knew that light eyes are more susceptible to UV damage.

"Wearing 100 percent UV-protective sunglasses is one of the easiest and the most important things children and adults can do to protect their ," clinical spokesperson for the AAO Anne Summers, M.D., said in a statement.

Explore further: Study examines UV nail salon lamps, risk of skin cancer

More information: More Information

Related Stories

Study examines UV nail salon lamps, risk of skin cancer

April 30, 2014
Using higher-wattage ultra violet (UV) lamps at nail salons to dry and cure polish was associated with more UV-A radiation being emitted, but the brief exposure after a manicure would require multiple visits for potential ...

Malfunction in molecular 'proofreader' prevents repair of UV-induced DNA damage

April 21, 2014
Malfunctions in the molecular "proofreading" machinery, which repairs structural errors in DNA caused by ultraviolet (UV) light damage, help explain why people who have the disease xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are at an extremely ...

The Medical Minute: July is eye injury prevention month

July 8, 2011
Summer is here and from lawn care and household projects to summer sports, there are plenty of things we find to keep ourselves busy during these hot months. And the best thing about July … the fireworks! But before ...

Recommended for you

Combination of type 2 diabetes and sleep apnoea indicates eyesight loss within four years

July 4, 2017
Research led by the University of Birmingham has discovered that patients who suffer from both Type 2 diabetes and obstructive sleep apnoea are at greater risk of developing a condition that leads to blindness within an average ...

Nearly 60% of pinkeye patients receive antibiotic eye drops, but they're seldom necessary

June 28, 2017
A new study suggests that most people with acute conjunctivitis, or pinkeye, are getting the wrong treatment.

Magnetic implants used to treat 'dancing eyes'

June 26, 2017
A research team has successfully used magnets implanted behind a person's eyes to treat nystagmus, a condition characterised by involuntary eye movements.

Drug shows promise against vision-robbing disease in seniors

June 21, 2017
An experimental drug is showing promise against an untreatable eye disease that blinds older adults—and intriguingly, it seems to work in patients who carry a particular gene flaw that fuels the damage to their vision.

Reproducing a retinal disease on a chip

June 15, 2017
Approximately 80% of all sensory input is received via the eyes, so suffering from chronic retinal diseases that lead to blindness causes a significant decrease in the quality of life (QOL). And because retinal diseases are ...

New gene therapy for vision loss proven safe in humans

May 16, 2017
In a small and preliminary clinical trial, Johns Hopkins researchers and their collaborators have shown that an experimental gene therapy that uses viruses to introduce a therapeutic gene into the eye is safe and that it ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.