Demographics can guide effort to curb sugary beverage intake

May 1, 2014
Demographics can guide effort to curb sugary beverage intake

(HealthDay)—The consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) varies by state and other demographic and behavioral characteristics, according to research published online April 24 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.

Sohyun Park, Ph.D., of the CDC in Atlanta, and colleagues used data from the 2011 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System for 38,978 adults, aged 18 years or older, from six states (Delaware, Hawaii, Iowa, Minnesota, New Jersey, and Wisconsin) to assess patterns and characteristics associated with intake of SSBs.

The researchers found that 23.9 percent of adults drank SSBs at least once daily. Younger adults, males, and non-Hispanic blacks were significantly more likely to drink SSBs one or more times per day. Significantly increased odds of drinking SSBs one or more times per day were also associated with lower education, low income, missing income data, or certain states of residence. Adults with fruit intake of less than one time per day versus one or more times per day, adults who were physically inactive versus highly active, and current smokers versus nonsmokers also were at significantly increased risk of consuming SSBs one or more times per day.

"States can use findings from this study to tailor efforts to decrease SSB intake and to encourage consumption of more healthful beverages (e.g., water) among their high-risk populations," the authors write.

Explore further: Research concludes sugar-sweetened beverages contribute to US obesity epidemic, particularly among children

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maureen_aba
not rated yet May 05, 2014
Sugar-sweetened beverages, available in low- and no-calorie options, are enjoyed by many consumers and can certainly be part of a balanced, active life. When it comes to enhancing the health of Americans, the prevailing takeaway should be that all calories count, as does physical exercise. Education can emphasize the importance of embracing a healthy balance and help change behaviors that yield positive, long-term results for American health.
-Maureen Beach, American Beverage Association

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