Review examines diagnosis, management of preschool wheeze

May 5, 2014
Review examines diagnosis, management of preschool wheeze

(HealthDay)—Preschool children have high asthma morbidity, and further research on the short- and long-term outcomes is needed, according to a review published online May 3 in The Lancet. This review is part of a series published ahead of World Asthma Day on May 6 and the annual meeting of the American Thoracic Society, held from May 16 to 21 in San Diego.

Francine M. Ducharme, M.D., from the Sainte-Justine University Health Centre in Montreal, and colleagues conducted a systematic review to investigate diagnosis, management, and prognosis of preschool wheeze.

The researchers note that have higher asthma morbidity than other age groups, and that preschool wheeze is highly prevalent. The diagnosis of wheeze in is challenging, with the two most frequent causes of wheezing being bronchiolitis and asthma. Different phenotypes have been identified, and the heterogeneity is due to interactions between genetics and pre- and postnatal environmental factors. Preschool children with wheeze have been suggested to have lasting deficits in lung function that persist into adulthood. In trials of children with interim symptoms or atopy, the most effective therapy for recurrent wheezing was daily-inhaled corticosteroids, while intermittent high-dose inhaled corticosteroids seemed effective for moderate-to-severe viral-induced wheezing without interim symptoms.

"Irrespective of phenotype, researchers need to document whether achieved rapidly after the initial diagnosis in early childhood predicts medium-term and long-term disease evolution (remission, persistence, and recurrence); acute-care use of health resources (morbidity); and consequently health care costs," the authors write.

One author disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

Explore further: Smoking during pregnancy increases the risk of wheeze and asthma in preschool children

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Related Stories

Smoking during pregnancy increases the risk of wheeze and asthma in preschool children

August 17, 2012
Maternal smoking during pregnancy is associated with wheeze and asthma inpreschool children, even among children who were not exposed to maternal smoking late inpregnancy or after birth, according to a new study.

Indoor air pollution tied to asthma, asthma-related symptoms

March 8, 2014
(HealthDay)—Indoor air pollution, specifically mold and environmental tobacco smoke, is associated with asthma and asthma-related respiratory symptoms in middle-aged adults, according to a study published online Feb. 12 ...

Pre-term birth and asthma: Preterm birth may increase the risk of asthma and wheezing disorders during childhood

March 7, 2014
Researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) in Boston, Massachusetts, in collaboration with investigators at the Maastricht University Medical Centre and Maastricht University School of Public Health in the Netherlands ...

Study suggests reduced lung function in infancy associated with wheeze later

February 19, 2013
A study in Australia suggests that reduced lung function in infancy was associated with wheezing beyond childhood at 18 years of age, according to a report published Online First by JAMA Pediatrics, a JAMA Network publication.

Link ID'd for introduction of fish, childhood wheeze

November 12, 2012
(HealthDay)—The introduction of fish between the ages of 6 and 12 months, but not consumption afterward, correlates with a reduction in the risk of wheezing in children at age 48 months, according to a study published online ...

Recommended for you

New comparison chart sheds light on babies' tears

July 10, 2017
A chart that enables parents and clinicians to calculate if a baby is crying more than it should in the first three months of its life has been created by a Kingston University London researcher, following a study of colic ...

Blood of SIDS infants contains high levels of serotonin

July 3, 2017
Blood samples from infants who died of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) had high levels of serotonin, a chemical that carries signals along and between nerves, according to a study funded in part by the National Institutes ...

Is your child's 'penicillin allergy' real?

July 3, 2017
(HealthDay)—Many children suspected of being allergic to the inexpensive, first-line antibiotic penicillin actually aren't, new research indicates.

Probiotic supplements failed to prevent babies' infections

July 3, 2017
(HealthDay)—Probiotic supplements may not protect babies from catching colds or stomach bugs in day care, a new clinical trial suggests.

Starting school young can put child wellbeing at risk

June 22, 2017
New research has shown that the youngest pupils in each school year group could be at risk of worse mental health than their older classmates.

Fidget spinners are the latest toy craze, but the medical benefits are unclear

June 21, 2017
Last week, German customs agents in Frankfurt Airport seized 35 metric tons of an imported plastic device, destroying the shipment for public safety purposes before it could infiltrate the country's marketplaces.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.