Financial insecurities hinder women from adhering to diabetes regimen

May 9, 2014 by Jared Wadley, University of Michigan

(Medical Xpress)—Changes imposed by a diabetes regimen are considered unmanageable by financially insecure women, a new University of Michigan study indicates.

Study participants who were brought up with fewer resources were more likely to have family members who were diabetic when fewer treatment options were available, exposing them to the worst-case scenario. Women with more resources were aware of less severe cases and typically had more ties to the health care field.

"It became apparent that having previous knowledge about and the regimen, as well as having previous experiences viewing complications unfold among loved ones, shaped the experience of diagnosis and attitudes toward diabetes," said Emily Nicklett, U-M assistant professor of social work and the study's lead author.

Financially secure have greater access to self- and a more optimistic outlook than women who don't have the same financial security.

Nicklett, who published the research with colleague Sara Kuzminski Damiano of the University of Southern California, examined experiences among women with Type 2 diabetes in the Detroit area. Their ages ranged from 51 to 92. They were asked when they learned they had diabetes, their interaction with the doctor, their daily routine and their financial status. Results were based on surveys as well as semi-structured interviews.

Research participants recalled experiencing fear, depression or denial after being diagnosed with diabetes. Those with a more favorable financial situation tended to be more optimistic about their diagnosis: "I can handle it."

Knowledge and experience about diabetes prior to diagnosis could be partially responsible for this difference.

Explore further: Women with diabetes less likely to have a mammogram

More information: Emily Joy Nicklett and Sara Kuzminski Damiano. "Too little, too late: Socioeconomic disparities in the experience of women living with diabetes." Qualitative Social Work May 2014 13: 372-388, first published on February 3, 2014. DOI: 10.1177/1473325014522572

Related Stories

Women with diabetes less likely to have a mammogram

April 11, 2014
Women with diabetes are 14 per cent less likely to be screened for breast cancer compared to women without diabetes, according to a study by researchers at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) and Women's ...

Becoming disabled may up risk of developing diabetes

February 28, 2014
(HealthDay)—Functional decline and physical disability may increase the subsequent risk of diabetes in older adults, according to research published online Feb. 18 in Diabetes Care.

Twenty-five percent of breast cancer survivors report financial decline due to treatment

March 25, 2014
Four years after being treated for breast cancer, a quarter of survivors say they are worse off financially, at least partly because of their treatment, according to a new study led by University of Michigan Comprehensive ...

Elevated liver enzyme levels linked to higher gestational diabetes risk

May 2, 2014
Women with high levels of a common liver enzyme measured prior to pregnancy were twice as likely to subsequently develop gestational diabetes than those with the lowest levels, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published ...

Having children lowers mortality in people with type 1 diabetes, but for women more than men

September 24, 2013
New research published at this week's annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Barcelona, Spain, shows that having children lowers mortality in people with type 1 diabetes, but for women ...

Gestational diabetes tied to seven-fold increase in sleep apnea risk

August 20, 2013
Women diagnosed with gestational diabetes are nearly seven times more likely to have obstructive sleep apnea than other pregnant women, according to a recent study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society's Journal ...

Recommended for you

Diabetes gene found that causes low and high blood sugar levels in the same family

January 15, 2018
A study of families with rare blood sugar conditions has revealed a new gene thought to be critical in the regulation of insulin, the key hormone in diabetes.

Discovery could lead to new therapies for diabetics

January 12, 2018
New research by MDI Biological Laboratory scientist Sandra Rieger, Ph.D., and her team has demonstrated that an enzyme she had previously identified as playing a role in peripheral neuropathy induced by cancer chemotherapy ...

Enzyme shown to regulate inflammation and metabolism in fat tissue

January 11, 2018
The human body has two primary kinds of fat—white fat, which stores excess calories and is associated with obesity, and brown fat, which burns calories in order to produce heat and has garnered interest as a potential means ...

Big strides made in diabetes care

January 5, 2018
(HealthDay)—This past year was a busy, productive one for diabetes research and care.

Gene therapy restores normal blood glucose levels in mice with type 1 diabetes

January 4, 2018
Type 1 diabetes is a chronic disease in which the immune system attacks and destroys insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas, resulting in high blood levels of glucose. A study published January 4th in Cell Stem Cell ...

Goodbye, needles? Patch might be the future for blood-sugar tracking

January 4, 2018
(HealthDay)—Developers of a new patch hope to eliminate a big barrier in type 2 diabetes treatment—painful finger-sticks and injections. The new patch—which actually uses an array of tiny needles that researchers promise ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.