Fitness impacts concentric remodeling, diastolic function

May 8, 2014
Fitness impacts concentric remodeling, diastolic function

(HealthDay)—Low cardiorespiratory fitness is associated with increased concentricity and diastolic dysfunction, according to a study published in the April issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Heart Failure.

Stephanie K. Brinker, M.D., from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, and colleagues estimated in participants (1,678 men and 1,247 women) of the Cooper Center Longitudinal Study. Participants received an echocardiogram from 1999 to 2011 and were categorized into age-specific quartiles of fitness, with quartile 1 representing low fitness.

The researchers found that higher levels of mid-life fitness (metabolic equivalents) correlated with larger indexed left atrial volume and indexed left ventricular end-diastolic diameter. There was also a correlation for higher level of fitness with a smaller relative wall thickness and E/e' ratio. No significant association was observed for low fitness with left ventricular systolic function.

"Low fitness is associated with a higher prevalence of concentric remodeling and , suggesting that exercise may lower risk through its effect on favorable cardiac remodeling and improved ," the authors write.

Two authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical and medical device industries.

Explore further: Getting fit in middle age can reduce heart failure risk

More information: Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Getting fit in middle age can reduce heart failure risk

May 15, 2013
Middle aged and out of shape? It's not too late to get fit—and reduce your risk for heart failure, according to research presented at the American Heart Association's Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Scientific Sessions ...

Higher midlife fitness linked to lower all-cause dementia risk

February 5, 2013
(HealthDay)—Individuals with higher midlife cardiorespiratory fitness levels are significantly less likely to develop all-cause dementia later in life, according to research published in the Feb. 5 issue of the Annals of ...

Direct fitness measures better predict cardiometabolic risk

February 21, 2014
(HealthDay)—Directly measured fitness is more strongly associated with cardiovascular risk than self-reported physical activity level, according to research published in the Feb. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Diastolic dysfunction appears to worsen over time; associated with increased risk of heart failure

August 23, 2011
A follow-up of participants in a heart function study finds that the prevalence of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (left ventricular filling [with blood] is abnormal and is accompanied by elevated filling pressures) ...

Exercise may reduce the risk of epilepsy later in life for men

September 4, 2013
New research suggests that men who exercise vigorously as young adults may reduce their risk of developing epilepsy later in life. The study is published in the September 4, 2013, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal ...

Fitness, obesity independently affect cardiometabolic risk

April 3, 2013
(HealthDay)—Fitness and obesity are independently associated with cardiometabolic (CM) risk, according to a study published in the April 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Recommended for you

Could aggressive blood pressure treatments lead to kidney damage?

July 18, 2017
Aggressive combination treatments for high blood pressure that are intended to protect the kidneys may actually be damaging the organs, new research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine suggests.

Quantifying effectiveness of treatment for irregular heartbeat

July 17, 2017
In a small proof-of-concept study, researchers at Johns Hopkins report a complex mathematical method to measure electrical communications within the heart can successfully predict the effectiveness of catheter ablation, the ...

Concerns over side effects of statins stopping stroke survivors taking medication

July 17, 2017
Negative media coverage of the side effects associated with taking statins, and patients' own experiences of taking the drugs, are among the reasons cited by stroke survivors and their carers for stopping taking potentially ...

Study discovers anticoagulant drugs are being prescribed against safety advice

July 17, 2017
A study by researchers at the University of Birmingham has shown that GPs are prescribing anticoagulants to patients with an irregular heartbeat against official safety advice.

Protein may protect against heart attack

July 14, 2017
DDK3 could be used as a new therapy to stop the build-up of fatty material inside the arteries

Heart study finds faulty link between biomarkers and clinical outcomes

July 14, 2017
Surrogate endpoints (biomarkers), which are routinely used in clinical research to test new drugs, should not be trusted as the ultimate measure to approve new health interventions in cardiovascular medicine, according to ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.