Physical therapy for hip osteoarthritis does not provide greater improvement for pain

May 20, 2014

Among adults with painful hip osteoarthritis, physical therapy did not result in greater improvement in pain or function compared with a placebo treatment, but was associated with relatively frequent but mild adverse effects, raising questions about its value for these patients, according to a study in the May 21 issue of JAMA.

Hip osteoarthritis is a prevalent and costly chronic musculoskeletal condition. Clinical guidelines recommend physical therapy as treatment, however costs are significant, and evidence about its effectiveness is inconclusive, according to background information in the article.

Kim L. Bennell, Ph.D., of the University of Melbourne, Australia, and colleagues randomly assigned patients with to attend 10 sessions of either (n = 49; included education and advice, manual therapy, home exercise, and walking aid if appropriate) or sham treatment (n = 53; included inactive ultrasound and inert gel). For 24 weeks after treatment, the active group continued unsupervised home exercise while the sham group self-applied gel three times weekly.

The researchers found that at weeks 13 and 36 the active treatment did not confer additional benefits over the sham treatment on measures of pain and physical function, which were improved in both groups. The treatment group reported a significantly greater number of adverse events, although these were relatively mild in nature.

"These results question the benefits of such a program for this patient population," the authors conclude.

Explore further: Chiropractic care beats sham therapy for spinal pain

More information: DOI: 10.1001/jama.2014.4591

Related Stories

Chiropractic care beats sham therapy for spinal pain

November 19, 2013
(HealthDay)—Short-term chiropractic therapy is more effective than a sham intervention for treating spinal pain, but the difference is not clinically meaningful, according to research published in the Nov. 15 issue of Spine.

Osteoarthritis improved by extra physiotherapy programmes

July 24, 2013
Aanual physiotherapy or regular exercise programmes make a significant difference for people with painful osteoarthritis in the knee and hip joints, and are cost-effective, new research from the University of Otago shows.

Chiro pain grounds limited says placebo study

January 29, 2014
Adeverse events and reactions after chiropractic treatment may not be the result of the treatment itself, a Murdoch University study has found.

Arthroscopy of the knee joint for arthrosis: No benefit detectable

May 13, 2014
The benefit of therapeutic arthroscopy with lavage and possible debridement for the treatment of arthrosis of the knee joint (gonarthrosis) is not proven. There was no hint, indication or proof of benefit of therapeutic arthroscopy ...

Evidence remains inconclusive for the effectiveness of manual therapy

April 1, 2014
(Medical Xpress)—A continuing lack of evidence to support the effectiveness of manual therapy continues to prevent a meaningful conclusion on manipulation and mobilisation for conditions of the spine and extremities, according ...

Targeted exercise relieves sciatica pain

April 9, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Active conservative symptom-guided therapy for severe sciatica can safely reduce pain and improve neurological function at a rate that matches or surpasses outcomes from common higher-cost surgical interventions, ...

Recommended for you

Co-infection with two common gut pathogens worsens malnutrition in mice

July 27, 2017
Two gut pathogens commonly found in malnourished children combine to worsen malnutrition and impair growth in laboratory mice, according to new research published in PLOS Pathogens.

Finish your antibiotics course? Maybe not, experts say

July 27, 2017
British disease experts on Thursday suggested doing away with the "incorrect" advice to always finish a course of antibiotics, saying the approach was fuelling the spread of drug resistance.

Phase 3 trial confirms superiority of tocilizumab to steroids for giant cell arteritis

July 26, 2017
A phase 3 clinical trial has confirmed that regular treatment with tocilizumab, an inhibitor of interleukin-6, successfully reduced both symptoms of and the need for high-dose steroid treatment for giant cell arteritis, the ...

A large-scale 'germ trap' solution for hospitals

July 26, 2017
When an infectious airborne illness strikes, some hospitals use negative pressure rooms to isolate and treat patients. These rooms use ventilation controls to keep germ-filled air contained rather than letting it circulate ...

Researchers report new system to study chronic hepatitis B

July 25, 2017
Scientists from Princeton University's Department of Molecular Biology have successfully tested a cell-culture system that will allow researchers to perform laboratory-based studies of long-term hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections. ...

Male hepatitis B patients suffer worse liver ailments, regardless of lifestyle

July 25, 2017
Why men with hepatitis B remain more than twice as likely to develop severe liver disease than women remains a mystery, even after a study led by a recent Drexel University graduate took lifestyle choices and environments ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.