Workflow changes can remove practice hassles

May 23, 2014
Workflow changes can remove practice hassles

(HealthDay)—Physicians can implement workflow strategies that return their focus to patient care, according to an article published May 8 in Medical Economics.

The author of the article, Chris Mazzolini, writes that physicians face many practice challenges that remove focus from . There are steps that can be taken to improve workflow, including delegating appropriate functions to appropriate staff.

According to Mazzolini, strategies that can reduce practice hassles include defining workflows for both clinical and non-clinical staff; avoiding batching or stacking up items to complete later (such as charting, messages to be returned, lab and imaging results); delegating to ensure that the physician can work at the top of their license; and preparing now for the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision switch.

"Hassles will always be with us. We can manage hassles by managing our time," said Frederick E. Turton, M.D., from Emory Healthcare in Atlanta, while speaking at the American College of Physicians 2014 conference, according to the article.

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