Adolescent bullies, victims more likely to carry weapons

June 9, 2014

Adolescent bullies, victims and bully-victims (defined as those who are simultaneously both bullies and victims) were more likely to carry weapons.

Previous research suggests adolescents involved in bullying are more likely to carry weapons than peers who are not involved in bullying.

The authors reviewed and analyzed 22 studies for (n=257,179), 15 studies for (n=236,145) and eight studies for bully-victims (n=199,563).

Studies indicate that bullies, victims and bully-victims were more likely to carry weapons. Studies conducted in the U.S. found stronger associations between being a bully-victim and weapon-carrying than studies in other countries.

"The current meta-analysis suggests that bullying is related to weapon carrying among adolescents and further establishes bullying as a risk factor for adolescent problem behavior. Given the wide range of negative implications bullying may have, it is important that schools endeavor to reduce bullying among their students, preferably by using evidence-based methods." Mitch van Geel, Ph.D., of Leiden University, the Netherlands, and colleagues wrote in their JAMA Pediatrics paper.

Explore further: Scores of bullying victims bringing weapons to school

More information: JAMA Pediatr. Published online June 9, 2014. DOI: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2014.213

Related Stories

Scores of bullying victims bringing weapons to school

May 4, 2014

An estimated 200,000 high school students who are bullied bring weapons to school, according to research to be presented Sunday, May 4, at the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) annual meeting in Vancouver, British Columbia, ...

The long shadow of childhood bullying

May 20, 2014

"Bullying is not a harmless rite of passage, it is a public health issue which has far-reaching effects on adult health, wealth, criminality and social relationships."

Anti-bullying policy must focus on all of society

April 29, 2014

Policy to reduce bullying in the schoolyard needs to span all levels of society, say researchers from the University of Warwick, who warn that socioeconomic status is not a reliable indicator of whether a child is likely ...

More evidence that bullying raises kids' suicide risk

March 10, 2014

(HealthDay)—Children and teens involved in bullying—victims and perpetrators alike—are more likely to think about suicide or attempt it. And cyber bullying appears more strongly linked to suicidal thoughts than other ...

Recommended for you

For health and happiness, share good news

January 22, 2017

Service members, including both active and recently separated, have been called upon to fight overseas and to assist during natural disasters at home. They can face unique challenges when they return in both the workplace ...

The great unknown—risk-taking behaviour in adolescents

January 19, 2017

Adolescents are more likely to ignore information that could prompt them to rethink risky decisions. This may explain why information campaigns on risky behaviors such as drug abuse tend to have only limited success. These ...

Mandarin makes you more musical?

January 18, 2017

Mandarin makes you more musical - and at a much earlier age than previously thought. That's the suggestion of a new study from the University of California San Diego. But hold on there, overachiever parents, don't' rush just ...

Adoptees advantaged by birth language memory

January 18, 2017

Language learning very early on in life can be subconsciously retained even when no conscious knowledge of the early experience remains. The subconscious knowledge can then be tapped to speed up learning of the pronunciation ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.