Anatomic features not tied to pain in rotator cuff tears

June 9, 2014
Anatomic features not tied to pain in rotator cuff tears

(HealthDay)—Anatomic features associated with the severity of atraumatic rotator cuff tears are not associated with pain level, according to a study published in the May 21 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Warren R. Dunn, M.D., M.P.H., from University of Wisconsin in Madison, and colleagues evaluated 393 subjects with an atraumatic symptomatic full-thickness tear treated with physical therapy. Tear size, retraction, superior humeral head migration, and rotator cuff muscle atrophy were used to evaluate . A 10-point visual analog scale (VAS) in the patient-reported American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score was used to measure pain.

The researchers found that among the patients (48 percent female; median age, 61 years) the dominant shoulder was involved in 69 percent of the cases. In nearly three-quarter of cases (72 percent) the tear involved only the supraspinatus; the supraspinatus and infraspinatus, with or without the teres minor, in 21 percent; and only the subscapularis in 7 percent. Humeral head migration was seen in 16 percent of cases. Minimal tendon retraction was seen in 48 percent of cases, midhumeral in 34 percent, glenohumeral in 13 percent, and to the glenoid in 5 percent. At baseline, the median VAS pain score was 4.4. Controlling for other baseline factors, more comorbidities (P = 0.002), lower education level (P = 0.004), and race (P = 0.041) were significant factors associated with pain on presentation. Measures of rotator cuff tear severity were not correlated with pain.

"Anatomic features defining the severity of atraumatic rotator cuff tears are not associated with the ," the authors write.

At least one author, or their institution, disclosed financial ties to an entity in the biomedical arena.

Explore further: Shoulder revision repair surgery not as successful two years later, say researchers

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Shoulder revision repair surgery not as successful two years later, say researchers

March 15, 2014
Long-term outcomes of revision arthroscopic rotator cuff repair surgery is not as successful as in a first-time surgery, according to researchers from the Orthopaedic Research Institute in Sydney, Australia, who are presenting ...

Successful outcomes for most failed rotator cuff repairs

January 29, 2014
(HealthDay)—More than half of patients with failed rotator cuff repair have successful outcomes, and the presence of retear negatively affects clinical outcomes, according to two studies published in the Jan. 15 issue of ...

Few retears after partial-, full-thickness rotator cuff repair

June 29, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Retear rates after arthroscopic repair of both partial-thickness and full-thickness rotator cuff tears are low, with no difference in the retear rate or postoperative shoulder stiffness rate for tear thickness, ...

New health economics study highlights long-term benefits of rotator cuff surgery

November 20, 2013
Each year, close to 2 million people in the United States visit their doctor for shoulder pain associated with a rotator cuff injury. Approximately one-third of rotator cuff tears will require surgery, with the remaining ...

Shoulder replacement eases pain, improves motion in rheumatoid arthritis patients, study finds

January 13, 2014
Shoulder arthritis is a common problem for rheumatoid arthritis patients: pain and difficulty moving their arms can grow so severe that daily tasks and sleep become difficult. If medication and physical therapy aren't enough, ...

Ultrasound combined with pre-operative MRI is cost effective in evaluating rotator cuff tears

May 5, 2011
While ultrasound is usually viewed as more cost effective, MRI is most often used to evaluate the rotator cuff. When performing a cost utility analysis, utilizing an ultrasound as the initial imaging test for rotator cuff ...

Recommended for you

Defining optimal opioid pain medication prescription length following surgery

September 27, 2017
A new study led by researchers at the Center for Surgery and Public Health at Brigham and Women's Hospital analyzed opioid prescription data from the Department of Defense Military Health System Data Repository, identifying ...

Is older blood OK to use in a transfusion?

September 27, 2017
(HealthDay)—Using older red blood cells to give transfusions to critically ill patients doesn't appear to affect their risk of dying, Australian researchers report.

One weight-loss surgery shows lasting results

September 21, 2017
(HealthDay)—Obesity surgery can have long-lasting effects on weight and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure, a new study finds.

Hold the phone: An ambulance might lower your chances of surviving some injuries

September 20, 2017
Victims of gunshots and stabbings are significantly less likely to die if they're taken to the trauma center by a private vehicle than ground emergency medical services (EMS), according to results of a new analysis.

Surgeons have major influence on breast cancer treatment

September 13, 2017
A woman's choice of surgeon plays a significant role in whether she's likely to receive an increasingly popular aggressive breast cancer surgery.

Some thyroid cancer patients can safely delay surgery

September 4, 2017
Most people diagnosed with cancer want to start treatment as soon as possible, for fear that delaying care will allow their tumor to grow out of control.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.