Clinical guidelines issued for drug-induced liver injury

June 18, 2014
Clinical guidelines issued for drug-induced liver injury

(HealthDay)—Herbal and dietary supplements (HDS) account for an increasing proportion of idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (DILI), according to practice guidelines published online June 17 in the American Journal of Gastroenterology.

Naga P. Chalasani, M.D., from the Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis, and colleagues reviewed the evidence and developed clinical guidelines for idiosyncratic DILI. The recommendations are intended for use by physicians and other .

The guidelines focus on diagnostic evaluation and causality assessment, noting that DILI remains a diagnosis of exclusion. In addition, the researchers discuss risk factors, prognosis, and management of hepatotoxicity. Many HDS can cause DILI; among DILI cases, HDS are the second most common cause. The most common types of HDS implicated in causing disease are supplements used for body building and weight loss. Current safety regulations differ for HDS and for conventional prescription medications, with no requirement for premarketing safety analysis of HDS. Patients and providers should be aware of this, as well as being aware of the potential for HDS to cause . Current causality approaches are not well suited to HDS hepatotoxicity.

"A lot of consumers have a preconceived notion that if it's a natural product, it must be safe. But that is not necessarily the case," a coauthor said in a statement. "Most of these products are not well-regulated and have very little oversight."

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

Explore further: Herbal and dietary supplements can adversely affect prescribed drugs says extensive review

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Herbal and dietary supplements can adversely affect prescribed drugs says extensive review

October 24, 2012
A number of herbs and dietary supplements (HDS) can cause potentially harmful drug interactions, particularly among people receiving medication for problems with their central nervous or cardiovascular systems.

Dietary supplements can cause liver injury, warns expert

October 29, 2012
Dose-dependent (acetaminophen) and idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injuries (DILI) are the leading cause of acute liver failure in the United States and are responsible for approximately 50 percent of all reported cases.

Drug-induced liver injury is on the rise

June 26, 2013
More people are being affected by drug-induced liver injury (DILI) than ever before, according to a new study in Gastroenterology, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. This type of liver injury ...

IU gastroenterologist develops practice guidelines for most prevalent liver disease

June 21, 2012
An Indiana University School of Medicine gastroenterologist led a team of distinguished physicians who developed the first guidelines for diagnosis and management of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. The guidelines were ...

Recommended for you

Google searches can be used to track dengue in underdeveloped countries

July 20, 2017
An analytical tool that combines Google search data with government-provided clinical data can quickly and accurately track dengue fever in less-developed countries, according to new research published in PLOS Computational ...

MRSA emerged years before methicillin was even discovered

July 19, 2017
Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) emerged long before the introduction of the antibiotic methicillin into clinical practice, according to a study published in the open access journal Genome Biology. It was ...

New test distinguishes Zika from similar viral infections

July 18, 2017
A new test is the best-to-date in differentiating Zika virus infections from infections caused by similar viruses. The antibody-based assay, developed by researchers at UC Berkeley and Humabs BioMed, a private biotechnology ...

'Superbugs' study reveals complex picture of E. coli bloodstream infections

July 18, 2017
The first large-scale genetic study of Escherichia coli (E. coli) cultured from patients with bloodstream infections in England showed that drug resistant 'superbugs' are not always out-competing other strains. Research by ...

Ebola virus can persist in monkeys that survived disease, even after symptoms disappear

July 17, 2017
Ebola virus infection can be detected in rhesus monkeys that survive the disease and no longer show symptoms, according to research published by Army scientists in today's online edition of the journal Nature Microbiology. ...

Mountain gorillas have herpes virus similar to that found in humans

July 13, 2017
Scientists from the University of California, Davis, have detected a herpes virus in wild mountain gorillas that is very similar to the Epstein-Barr virus in humans, according to a study published today in the journal Scientific ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.