Tips for keeping that bounce house safe

June 22, 2014
Tips for keeping that bounce house safe
Children get hurt when colliding with others or falling, expert says, so supervision is needed.

(HealthDay)—Inflatable bounce houses may be fun for kids, but only if they're used correctly, experts caution.

If certain safety precautions are not followed, injuries can occur. Most often, kids hurt their elbows or other parts of their upper body when they collide with other kids or fall out of the bouncer, the experts noted. So is paramount.

"Bounce houses are a great way to get kids active and are considered a relatively manageable risk, since severity of injuries is usually less than that of a trampoline," said Dr. Teresa Cappello, a at Loyola University Health System in Illinois.

"Still, injuries and fractures are fairly common from bounce house play, and parents need to supervise the ," she explained in a Loyola news release.

"If you have a bounce house in your backyard or neighborhood party, please make sure a responsible adult is monitoring what's going on at all times," she added.

Injuries inside of bounce houses typically occur when children of different sizes are jumping at the same time. Cappello advised parents to divide children into groups according to age and size, and then post an adult at the entrance of the bouncer to keep watch.

"Parents need to enforce the separation of ages when playing and have kids take turns in the house," Cappello said. "It's more fun for kids if they have space to jump and play, and it's always a good lesson to learn to take turns. If you're planning a party, add bounce house monitor to your list of volunteer duties."

Limiting the number of children in the bounce house at one time is also important. If the bouncer becomes too crowded, the kids are more likely to fall out and get hurt.

If an injury does occur, parents should remove the child from the crowd and assess the situation. Any physical deformity or asymmetry in the extremities should be treated in the emergency room. If the injury does not appear abnormal, parents can take a "wait and see" approach. If the child has pain that does not resolve after a day, it's time to visit the doctor.

"Often think if a child can move the arm, then it's not broken. This is not always the case in . Many times children are able to move their arms even if there is a broken bone," Cappello noted. "If the child is still in pain the following day, even if the child can move the injured extremity, he or she should be seen by a physician and have an X-ray."

Explore further: Study finds 15-fold increase in inflatable bouncer-related injuries among children

More information: The Child Injury Prevention Alliance has more on the proper use of inflatable bounce houses.

Related Stories

Study finds 15-fold increase in inflatable bouncer-related injuries among children

November 26, 2012
A new study by researchers at the Center for Injury Research and Policy of The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital examined pediatric injuries associated with inflatable bouncers, such as bounce houses and ...

Broken bones, concussions most common injuries in youth hockey

June 5, 2014
(HealthDay)—Broken bones and concussions are the most common injuries that children who play ice hockey suffer, a new study reveals.

Baby safety gates aren't always safe, study finds

May 5, 2014
Baby gates meant to protect young children aren't always as safe as parents think. A new study says nearly 2,000 U.S. kids get emergency room treatment each year from injuries resulting from falling through or climbing on ...

Expert pitches safety tips for young baseball players

April 6, 2013
(HealthDay)—Baseball is one of the safest sports for children, but even so there are potential risks that can result in serious injury, an expert warns.

Sports safety: Get geared up and always warm up

April 20, 2012
April is Youth Sports Safety Month. Each year, more than 3.5 million children under the age of 15 are treated for sports injuries nationwide. Roughly half of these injuries are sustained in solo activities, while approximately ...

Recommended for you

Across Asia, liver cancer is linked to herbal remedies: study

October 18, 2017
Researchers have uncovered widespread evidence of a link between traditional Chinese herbal remedies and liver cancer across Asia, a study said Wednesday.

Eating better throughout adult years improves physical fitness in old age, suggests study

October 18, 2017
People who have a healthier diet throughout their adult lives are more likely to be stronger and fitter in older age than those who don't, according to a new study led by the University of Southampton.

Global calcium consumption appears low, especially in Asia

October 18, 2017
Daily calcium intake among adults appears to vary quite widely around the world in distinct regional patterns, according to a new systematic review of research data ahead of World Osteoporosis Day on Friday, Oct. 20.

New study: Nearly half of US medical care comes from emergency rooms

October 17, 2017
Nearly half of all US medical care is delivered by emergency departments, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM). And in recent years, the percentage of care delivered ...

Experts devise plan to slash unnecessary medical testing

October 17, 2017
Researchers at top hospitals in the U.S. and Canada have developed an ambitious plan to eliminate unnecessary medical testing, with the goal of reducing medical bills while improving patient outcomes, safety and satisfaction.

No evidence that widely marketed technique to treat leaky bladder/prolapse works

October 16, 2017
There is no scientific evidence that a workout widely marketed to manage the symptoms of a leaky bladder and/or womb prolapse actually works, conclude experts in an editorial published online in the British Journal of Sports ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.