OpenAnesthesia announces Android and iOS versions of self-study app

June 24, 2014

OpenAnesthesia (OA), one of the most popular websites for education in anesthesia, announces the release of V 3.0 of the hugely popular self-study app for anesthesiology residents, CRNAs, SRNAs, and physicians. The app, specifically designed to improve knowledge within the field of anesthesiology, is free to download on iTunes and the Google Store.

The OA Self-Study App for iOS and Android devices is designed to help resident anesthesiologists, physicians, and those in the related health professions to improve their knowledge of basic and advanced concepts of the field. The OA app contains all ABA keywords from the 2008-2014 in-training examinations, provides 50 free questions for all users, and offers an additional 450 questions for in-app purchase. All the questions review essential core concepts. Each question has been written by a physician editor and contains a full explanation of the answer, along with links to related keywords and articles in OpenAnesthesia, Anesthesia & Analgesia, A&A Case Reports, and PubMed.

Edward C. Nemergut, MD, founder of OpenAnesthesia, says: "Many of our users have asked for additional study questions, as well as an Android version, and I'm delighted that we can finally offer both with Release 3.0." Adds Dr. Nemergut, "The overwhelming worldwide response we've had to this app tells us that the need for solid online tools – such as our OA – is essential for the new generation of residents and ."

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