Science behind driving behavior, aptitude explored in new blog

June 11, 2014, Association for Psychological Science
Science behind driving behavior, aptitude explored in new blog

For every law-abiding motorist, there is another driver who is breaking the speed limit and cutting off other drivers in traffic. For every person who easily follows driving directions to reach a destination, there are others who always seem to get lost.

Psychological scientists have been studying these sorts of driving behaviors for decades, and have made many discoveries about the decisions, risks, and mistakes that occur behind the wheel.

This line of research is the focus of Minds on the Road, a new blog devoted exclusively to the scientific study of behaviors, emotions, skills, and errors that we display when driving.

The Association for Psychological Science (APS), an organization dedicated to the advancement of scientific psychology, is launching the online publication to showcase research on the decisions we make, the risks we take, and the mistakes we make in the driver's seat.

Minds on the Road will feature the latest research on a variety of that affect patterns and safety. It will explore new findings about:

  • distracted driving;
  • roadway aggression;
  • behind the wheel;
  • navigation ability;
  • driving under the influence;
  • and much more.

The blog will feature groundbreaking research from the world's leading scholarly journals, including the APS publications Psychological Science, Current Directions in Psychological Science, Perspectives on Psychological Science.

The most recent post, for example, explores the issue of kids and traffic accidents, highlighting research that suggests that kids perform worse than adults when it comes to actually detecting oncoming cars.

Explore further: Young drivers who take risks on the road have a greater risk of mental health problems

Related Stories

Young drivers who take risks on the road have a greater risk of mental health problems

May 16, 2011
Young adults who take risks when driving are more likely to experience psychological distress, including mental health problems such as anxiety and depression, reveals research published ahead of print in Injury Prevention.

A new approach to cut death toll of young people in road accidents

April 24, 2014
Too often in Australia we hear tragic stories of another young life cut short in a car accident and yet any attempts to dramatically reduce the death toll are not working.

Loud talking and horseplay in car results in more serious incidents for teen drivers

April 17, 2014
Adolescent drivers are often distracted by technology while they are driving, but loud conversations and horseplay between passengers appear more likely to result in a dangerous incident, according to a new study from the ...

Driving... a road to poor health?

June 11, 2014
As little as two hours a day behind the wheel is a potential risk factor for a range of poor health behaviours and outcomes, a University of Sydney study has shown.

Recommended for you

Intensive behavior therapy no better than conventional support in treating teenagers with antisocial behavior

January 19, 2018
Research led by UCL has found that intensive and costly multisystemic therapy is no better than conventional therapy in treating teenagers with moderate to severe antisocial behaviour.

Babies' babbling betters brains, language

January 18, 2018
Babies are adept at getting what they need - including an education. New research shows that babies organize mothers' verbal responses, which promotes more effective language instruction, and infant babbling is the key.

College branding makes beer more salient to underage students

January 18, 2018
In recent years, major beer companies have tried to capitalize on the salience of students' university affiliations, unveiling marketing campaigns and products—such as "fan cans," store displays, and billboard ads—that ...

Inherited IQ can increase in early childhood

January 18, 2018
When it comes to intelligence, environment and education matter – more than we think.

Baby brains help infants figure it out before they try it out

January 17, 2018
Babies often amaze their parents when they seemingly learn new skills overnight—how to walk, for example. But their brains were probably prepping for those tasks long before their first steps occurred, according to researchers.

Reducing sessions of trauma-focused psychotherapy does not affect effectiveness

January 17, 2018
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) patients treated with as few as five sessions of trauma-focused psychotherapy find it equally effective as receiving 12 sessions.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.