Women more likely to be aggressive than men in relationships

June 26, 2014, British Psychological Society

Women are more likely to be verbally and physically aggressive towards their partners than men suggests a new study presented as part of a symposium on intimate partner violence (IPV).

The symposium 'Developments in Intimate Partner Violence Research and Practice' is presented today, Wednesday 25 June, at the British Psychological Society's Division of Forensic Psychology annual conference in Glasgow.

Dr Elizabeth Bates from the University of Cumbria and colleagues from the University of Central Lancashire gave a total of 1104 students (706 and 398 ) questionnaires about their and controlling behaviour, to partners and to same-sex others (including friends).

Analysis showed that women were more likely to be physically aggressive to their partners than men and that men were more likely to be physically aggressive to their same-sex others.

Furthermore, women engaged in significantly higher levels of controlling behaviour than men, which significantly predicted physical aggression in both sexes.

Dr Elizabeth Bates explained: "This was an interesting finding. Previous studies have sought to explain male violence towards women as rising from patriarchal values, which motivate men to seek to control women's behaviour, using violence if necessary.

"This study found that women demonstrated a desire to control their and were more likely to use physical aggression than men. This suggests that IPV may not be motivated by patriarchal values and needs to be studied within the context of other forms of aggression, which has potential implications for interventions."

Explore further: Study finds link between alcohol use and domestic violence

Related Stories

Study finds link between alcohol use and domestic violence

January 27, 2014
Alcohol use is more likely than marijuana use to lead to violence between partners, according to studies done at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

Intimate partner violence in men who have sex with men is linked to adverse health effects

March 4, 2014
Intimate partner violence (IPV) among men who have sex with men (MSM) is linked to greater risk of mental and physical health symptoms, substance misuse, and sexually transmitted infections, according to a research article ...

Heavy drinking linked to more frequent and more severe aggression in relationships

July 5, 2011
(Medical Xpress) -- Drinking by one or both partners increases levels of severity, anger and fear reported by victims of intimate partner aggression, according to a new study by University of Otago researchers.

Male victims of 'intimate terrorism' can experience damaging psychological effects

April 7, 2011
Men who are abused by their female partners can suffer significant psychological trauma, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, depression and suicidal thoughts, according to two new papers published by the American Psychological ...

Link found between intimate partner violence and termination of pregnancy

January 7, 2014
Intimate partner violence in women (sometimes referred to as domestic violence) is linked to termination of pregnancy, according to a study by UK researchers published in this week's PLOS Medicine. The study, led by Susan ...

Bisexual women at especially high risk of sexual violence, CDC says

January 25, 2013
(HealthDay)—Bisexual women in the United States are more likely to suffer from domestic violence than either lesbian or heterosexual women, a new government report shows.

Recommended for you

How looking at the big picture can lead to better decisions

July 13, 2018
New research suggests how distancing yourself from a decision may help you make the choice that produces the most benefit for you and others affected.

Nature is proving to be awesome medicine for PTSD

July 13, 2018
The awe we feel in nature can dramatically reduce symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, according to UC Berkeley research that tracked psychological and physiological changes in war veterans and at-risk inner-city youth ...

Is depression during pregnancy on the rise?

July 13, 2018
(HealthDay)—Today's young mothers-to-be may be more likely to develop depression while pregnant than their own mothers were, a new study suggests.

Machine learning helps to predict the treatment outcomes of schizophrenia

July 12, 2018
Could the diagnosis and treatment of mental health disorders one day be aided through the help of machine learning? New research from the University of Alberta is bringing us closer to that future through a study published ...

Mental illness study to explore patients' self-assessments

July 12, 2018
As the mental health community pursues new ways to improve the lives of the severely ill, a University of Texas at Dallas researcher is focusing on what can be learned from patients' answers to a simple question: "How do ...

Stress affects people with schizophrenia differently, study shows

July 11, 2018
Stressful situations affect the brain and body differently in people with schizophrenia compared to people without the mental illness or individuals at high risk for developing psychosis, a new CAMH study shows. The relationship ...

2 comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

AlexCoe
5 / 5 (1) Jun 26, 2014
As a man who has been married twice, this comes as NO surprise whatsoever!
sirchick
not rated yet Aug 20, 2014
As a man who has been married twice, this comes as NO surprise whatsoever!


First time fair enough - but you did it twice, did you learn nothing from the first marriage???
--

Anyway - i cannot understand any man who sticks around if there girl is aggressive.. get some self esteem and move on.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.