A Crohn's disease-associated gene expression profile and microbial community

July 8, 2014, Journal of Clinical Investigation

Crohn's and other inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) can be painful and debilitating. There are no known cures for these diseases, but the symptoms can be managed. It is widely thought that IBDs develop as a result of an individual's genetic make-up, their gut microbiota, and environmental cues, though it is not fully understood how these factors promote IBDs.

A new study in the Journal of Clinical Investigation identifies a specific gene expression profile and microbial community associated with Crohn's disease. Lee Denson and colleagues at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center compared the intestines of healthy patients to pediatric Crohn's disease patients.

Crohn's disease patients had altered expression of 2 genes, DUOX2 and APOA1, as well as a distinct microbial community. Furthermore, APOA1 expression and microbial abundance could be used to predict clinical outcomes in Crohn's disease patients.

Explore further: Newly diagnosed Crohn's disease patients show imbalance in intestinal microbial population

More information: Pediatric Crohn disease patients exhibit specific ileal transcriptome and microbiome signature, J Clin Invest. DOI: 10.1172/JCI75436

Related Stories

Newly diagnosed Crohn's disease patients show imbalance in intestinal microbial population

March 12, 2014
A multi-institutional study led by investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and the Broad Institute has identified how the intestinal microbial population of newly diagnosed Crohn's disease patients differs ...

Depression tied to Crohn's disease flare-ups

May 5, 2014
(HealthDay)—Depression may increase the risk of Crohn's disease flare-ups in people with the inflammatory bowel disorder, an early new study suggests.

New research finds that enzyme is absent in Crohn's disease sufferers

September 18, 2013
Royal Veterinary College researcher Dr David Bishop-Bailey, alongside collaborators from University College London, Queen Mary University London, the University of Umeå and the National Institute of Environmental Health ...

Specialized intestinal cells cause some cases of Crohn's disease

October 2, 2013
Scientists have discovered that Crohn's disease, the inflammatory bowel disorder, can originate from specialised intestinal cell type called Paneth cells. As such, they propose that small intestinal Crohn's disease might ...

Biologic agents provide relief for children newly diagnosed with Crohn's disease

February 3, 2014
Children newly diagnosed with Crohn's disease may benefit from early treatment with the biologic drugs known as anti-TNF-α agents, according to a new study in Gastroenterology1, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological ...

Specific bacterial species may initiate, maintain Crohn's

October 22, 2012
Patients newly diagnosed with pediatric Crohn's disease had significantly different levels of certain types of bacteria in their intestinal tracts than age-matched controls, according to a paper in the October Journal of ...

Recommended for you

New study offers insights on genetic indicators of COPD risk

January 16, 2018
Researchers have discovered that genetic variations in the anatomy of the lungs could serve as indicators to help identify people who have low, but stable, lung function early in life, and those who are particularly at risk ...

Previous influenza virus exposures enhance susceptibility in another influenza pandemic

January 16, 2018
While past exposure to influenza A viruses often builds immunity to similar, and sometimes different, strains of the virus, Canadian researchers are calling for more attention to exceptions to that rule.

Don't hold your nose and close your mouth when you sneeze, doctors warn

January 15, 2018
Pinching your nose while clamping your mouth shut to contain a forceful sneeze isn't a good idea, warn doctors in the journal BMJ Case Reports.

New antifungal provides hope in fight against superbugs

January 12, 2018
Microscopic yeast have been wreaking havoc in hospitals around the world—creeping into catheters, ventilator tubes, and IV lines—and causing deadly invasive infection. One culprit species, Candida auris, is resistant ...

Dengue takes low and slow approach to replication

January 11, 2018
A new study reveals how dengue virus manages to reproduce itself in an infected person without triggering the body's normal defenses. Duke researchers report that dengue pulls off this hoax by co-opting a specialized structure ...

Different strains of same bacteria trigger widely varying immune responses

January 11, 2018
Genetic differences between different strains of the same pathogenic bacterial species appear to result in widely varying immune system responses, according to new research published in PLOS Pathogens.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.