Large variation in lipid reduction with high-dose statin tx

July 31, 2014
Large variation in lipid reduction with high-dose statin tx
There is considerable interindividual variation in the magnitude of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B reductions achieved with statin therapy, which affects cardiovascular disease risk, according to a study published in the August 5 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

(HealthDay)—There is considerable interindividual variation in the magnitude of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C), and apolipoprotein B (apoB) reductions achieved with statin therapy, which affects cardiovascular disease risk, according to a study published in the August 5 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

S. Matthijs Boekholdt, M.D., Ph.D., from the Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam, and colleagues conducted a meta-analysis using individual patient data from eight randomized controlled statin trials. Data were included for 38,153 patients who were allocated to , and underwent assessment for conventional lipids and apolipoproteins at baseline and at one-year follow-up.

The researchers found that 5,287 participants had 6,286 major cardiovascular events during follow-up. Reductions of LDL-C, non-HDL-C, and apoB were subject to large interindividual variability despite a fixed statin dose. More than 40 percent of those assigned to high-dose statins did not achieve an LDL-C target of <70 mg/dL. The adjusted hazard ratios for major cardiovascular events were 0.56, 0.51, and 0.44, respectively, for those who reached an LDL-C of 75 to <100 mg/dL, 50 to <75 mg/dL, and <50 mg/dL versus LDL-C >175 mg/dL. The findings were similar for non-HDL-C and apoB.

"Patients who achieve very low LDL-C levels have a lower risk for major cardiovascular events than do those achieving moderately low levels," conclude the authors.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

Explore further: Non-HDL-C level associated with risk of major cardiovascular events among patients taking statins

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