Lung groups: Governments should limit or ban use of E-cigarettes

July 10, 2014
Lung groups: governments should limit or ban use of E-cigarettes
Statement says more research needed on health effects of the nicotine-delivery devices.

(HealthDay)—Governments should ban or limit the use of electronic cigarettes until more is known about their health effects, say experts from the world's leading lung organizations.

The position statement was issued Wednesday by the Forum of International Respiratory Societies (FIRS), which includes more than 70,000 members worldwide.

"The gravity of tobacco use on global health and the historical behavior of the that has included deceit about the of tobacco, intentional marketing to children and manipulating nicotine levels in cigarettes to maintain addiction should prompt us to proceed cautiously," statement author Dr. Dean Schraufnagel, past president of the American Thoracic Society, said in a society news release.

"Nicotine is central to lifelong addiction, and [e-cigarettes] are nicotine-delivery devices," he added.

The safety of e-cigarettes has not been confirmed, nor have their potential benefits, such as helping people quit smoking, according to the statement. It also warned about the addictive power of nicotine and the possible risk that e-cigarette emissions pose to nonusers.

All health and safety claims about e-cigarettes should be supported by scientific evidence, the statement recommended. And if governments permit the use of e-cigarettes, the devices should be regulated as medicines or as .

The statement also said that research on e-cigarettes should be supported by sources other than tobacco companies and e-cigarette makers, and all findings should be made public and presented in easy-to-understand language.

In April, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration proposed long-awaited regulations governing the fast-growing electronic cigarette industry.

The new rules would give the FDA the authority to regulate e-cigarettes as tobacco products, placing them under the same requirements as cigarettes. That would include a ban on the sale to minors.

Explore further: E-cigarettes in Europe used mostly by the young, current smokers, would-be quitters

More information: The U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse has more about e-cigarettes.

Related Stories

E-cigarettes in Europe used mostly by the young, current smokers, would-be quitters

June 16, 2014
Most Europeans who have tried electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are young, current smokers, or those who recently tried quitting regular cigarettes, according to a new study from Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH). ...

FDA extending comment period on e-cigarette rules

June 21, 2014
The public will have more time to weigh in on a federal proposal to regulate electronic cigarettes and other tobacco products.

Smokers slow to embrace routine use of electronic cigarettes

June 4, 2014
Sales of electronic cigarettes in the U.S. reached nearly $1.8 billion in 2013, but few of the smokers who tried the product have made the permanent switch from regular tobacco cigarettes, finds a new study published in the ...

US lawmakers grill e-cigarette makers

June 19, 2014
US senators ripped at electronic cigarette makers Wednesday for their aggressive marketing campaigns to lure youths that have drawn parallels to those once used by Big Tobacco.

Researchers question e-cigarette regulation

May 30, 2014
Public health specialists in the UK have urged the World Health Organisation (WHO) not to "control and suppress" e-cigarettes as it prepares to publish global guidelines on the devices.

Study documents secondhand exposure to vapors from electronic cigarettes

December 13, 2013
Electronic cigarettes, when used indoors, may involuntarily expose non-users to nicotine, according to a study led by Maciej Goniewicz, PhD, PharmD, of Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI) and published by the journal Nicotine ...

Recommended for you

New study: Nearly half of US medical care comes from emergency rooms

October 17, 2017
Nearly half of all US medical care is delivered by emergency departments, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM). And in recent years, the percentage of care delivered ...

No evidence that widely marketed technique to treat leaky bladder/prolapse works

October 16, 2017
There is no scientific evidence that a workout widely marketed to manage the symptoms of a leaky bladder and/or womb prolapse actually works, conclude experts in an editorial published online in the British Journal of Sports ...

Ten pence restaurant chain levy on sugary drinks linked to fall in sales

October 16, 2017
The introduction of a 10 pence levy on sugar sweetened drinks across the 'Jamie's Italian' chain of restaurants in the UK was associated with a relatively large fall in sales of these beverages of between 9 and 11 per cent, ...

New exercises help athletes manage dangerous breathing disorder

October 16, 2017
A novel set of breathing techniques developed at National Jewish Health help athletes overcome vocal cord dysfunction and improve performance during high-intensity exercise. Vocal cord dysfunction, now also referred to as ...

Learning and staying in shape key to longer lifespan, study finds

October 13, 2017
People who are overweight cut their life expectancy by two months for every extra kilogramme of weight they carry, research suggests.

Blueberries may improve attention in children following double-blind trial

October 13, 2017
Primary school children could show better attention by consuming flavonoid-rich blueberries, following a study conducted by the University of Reading.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.