Lung groups: Governments should limit or ban use of E-cigarettes

July 10, 2014
Lung groups: governments should limit or ban use of E-cigarettes
Statement says more research needed on health effects of the nicotine-delivery devices.

(HealthDay)—Governments should ban or limit the use of electronic cigarettes until more is known about their health effects, say experts from the world's leading lung organizations.

The position statement was issued Wednesday by the Forum of International Respiratory Societies (FIRS), which includes more than 70,000 members worldwide.

"The gravity of tobacco use on global health and the historical behavior of the that has included deceit about the of tobacco, intentional marketing to children and manipulating nicotine levels in cigarettes to maintain addiction should prompt us to proceed cautiously," statement author Dr. Dean Schraufnagel, past president of the American Thoracic Society, said in a society news release.

"Nicotine is central to lifelong addiction, and [e-cigarettes] are nicotine-delivery devices," he added.

The safety of e-cigarettes has not been confirmed, nor have their potential benefits, such as helping people quit smoking, according to the statement. It also warned about the addictive power of nicotine and the possible risk that e-cigarette emissions pose to nonusers.

All health and safety claims about e-cigarettes should be supported by scientific evidence, the statement recommended. And if governments permit the use of e-cigarettes, the devices should be regulated as medicines or as .

The statement also said that research on e-cigarettes should be supported by sources other than tobacco companies and e-cigarette makers, and all findings should be made public and presented in easy-to-understand language.

In April, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration proposed long-awaited regulations governing the fast-growing electronic cigarette industry.

The new rules would give the FDA the authority to regulate e-cigarettes as tobacco products, placing them under the same requirements as cigarettes. That would include a ban on the sale to minors.

Explore further: E-cigarettes in Europe used mostly by the young, current smokers, would-be quitters

More information: The U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse has more about e-cigarettes.

Related Stories

E-cigarettes in Europe used mostly by the young, current smokers, would-be quitters

June 16, 2014
Most Europeans who have tried electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are young, current smokers, or those who recently tried quitting regular cigarettes, according to a new study from Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH). ...

FDA extending comment period on e-cigarette rules

June 21, 2014
The public will have more time to weigh in on a federal proposal to regulate electronic cigarettes and other tobacco products.

Smokers slow to embrace routine use of electronic cigarettes

June 4, 2014
Sales of electronic cigarettes in the U.S. reached nearly $1.8 billion in 2013, but few of the smokers who tried the product have made the permanent switch from regular tobacco cigarettes, finds a new study published in the ...

US lawmakers grill e-cigarette makers

June 19, 2014
US senators ripped at electronic cigarette makers Wednesday for their aggressive marketing campaigns to lure youths that have drawn parallels to those once used by Big Tobacco.

Researchers question e-cigarette regulation

May 30, 2014
Public health specialists in the UK have urged the World Health Organisation (WHO) not to "control and suppress" e-cigarettes as it prepares to publish global guidelines on the devices.

Study documents secondhand exposure to vapors from electronic cigarettes

December 13, 2013
Electronic cigarettes, when used indoors, may involuntarily expose non-users to nicotine, according to a study led by Maciej Goniewicz, PhD, PharmD, of Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI) and published by the journal Nicotine ...

Recommended for you

Motorcycle crashes cause five times as many deaths as car accidents, six times the health costs

November 20, 2017
Motorcycle accidents are costly in terms of lives and health care costs. Compared with car accidents, motorcycle accidents cause 3 times the injuries, 6 times the medical costs and 5 times the deaths, found new research in ...

New shoe makes running 4 percent easier, 2-hour marathon possible, study shows

November 17, 2017
Eleven days after Boulder-born Shalane Flanagan won the New York City Marathon in new state-of-the-art racing flats known as "4%s," University of Colorado Boulder researchers have published the study that inspired the shoes' ...

Vaping while pregnant could cause craniofacial birth defects, study shows

November 16, 2017
Using e-cigarettes during pregnancy could cause birth defects of the oral cavity and face, according to a recent Virginia Commonwealth University study.

Study: For older women, every movement matters

November 16, 2017
Folding your laundry or doing the dishes might not be the most enjoyable parts of your day. But simple activities like these may help prolong your life, according to the findings of a new study in older women led by the University ...

When vegetables are closer in price to chips, people eat healthier, study finds

November 16, 2017
When healthier food, like vegetables and dairy products, is pricier compared to unhealthy items, like salty snacks and sugary sweets, Americans are significantly less likely to have a high-quality diet, a new Drexel University ...

Children's exposure to secondhand smoke may be vastly underestimated by parents

November 15, 2017
Four out of 10 children in the US are exposed to secondhand smoke, according to the American Heart Association. A new Tel Aviv University study suggests that parents who smoke mistakenly rely on their own physical senses ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.