Poor teens' health may benefit from top schools

July 21, 2014 by Lindsey Tanner

A study suggests that disadvantaged teens may get more than an academic boost by attending top-notch high schools—their health may also benefit.

Risky behavior including binge-drinking, and use of hard drugs was less common among these kids, compared with peers who went to mostly worse schools. The teens were otherwise similar, all from low-income Los Angeles neighborhoods who applied to top public charter schools that admit students by lottery.

The researchers compared behavior in almost 1,000 kids in 10th through who were picked for the high-performing schools and in those who went elsewhere.

Overall, 36 percent of the selected kids engaged in at least one of 11 , compared with 42 percent of the other teens.

Results were published online Monday in Pediatrics.

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daniel_faith_581
not rated yet Jul 28, 2014
Honestly, I am with anything that can help children to succeed whether we are talking about poor kids or the ones with disabilities. If we have an opportunity to help, why not using it? I've seen so many children from poor districts who would want to study, but they have no decent option. The school their neighborhoods have are scary to go to as you may never come back. Let's remind ourselves that need to focus on education whether it is professional academic thesis writing at EssayOnlineStore here http://essayonlinestore.com/ or simply teaching kid to read

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