Tip-over furniture can kill kids

July 31, 2014
Tip-over furniture can kill kids
Experts share childproofing advice.

(HealthDay)—It can happen in an instant: A small child pulls up on a television, dresser or computer monitor and gets critically injured when the furniture tips over.

"Every parent or guardian of a young should look around their homes and imagine what could tip over, fall off walls and injure a child. Imagining it is better than it becoming a reality," Dr. Alex Rosenau, president of the American College of Emergency Physicians, said in a college news release.

Between 2009 and 2011, roughly 43,000 people ended up in a U.S. emergency room after an object or piece of furniture fell over on them. Young people were involved in 60 percent of these accidents. And nearly 300 kids ranging from 1 month to 8 years old died of their injuries, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.

There are steps parents and guardians can take to prevent serious and fatal "tip over" injuries. The emergency physicians recommend the following precautions:

  • Secure furniture to the wall. If you aren't sure how to do this, home improvement stores and child retail stores should be able to offer advice. It's also a good idea to replace any top-heavy furniture that can't be secured. This is particularly important for with shelves, drawers and doors.
  • Make sure that all computer monitors are also safely secured so they can't tip over.
  • Store television and computer equipment close to the ground. Other heavy and commonly used objects should also be stored low to the ground.
  • Don't put objects on top of TVs.
  • Large wall art or sculptures that could fall and hurt a child should be secured or removed.
  • Appliances, such as refrigerators, ovens and microwaves, should also be firmly in place.
  • Mounted TVs should be well out of reach of young children.

Use safety gates to keep children out of rooms that aren't childproof, the emergency physicians advised. "Telling a child not to touch or climb on something is not enough," said Rosenau. "You must take the first steps to prevent tragedy from happening in your home by childproofing each room they are in."

Explore further: 'Alarming' rise in children injured by falling TVs

More information: The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission provides more tips to prevent furniture "tip-over" injuries.

Related Stories

'Alarming' rise in children injured by falling TVs

July 22, 2013
(AP)—Falling televisions sent nearly 200,000 U.S. children to the emergency room over 20 years, and the injury rate has climbed substantially for these sometimes deadly accidents, a study found.

Thousands of kids injured in furniture accidents

May 5, 2011
In the winter months, more injuries occur in the home as children and their families are indoors for longer periods. In 2007, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) identified injuries from furniture tip-overs ...

Tips for keeping that bounce house safe

June 22, 2014
(HealthDay)—Inflatable bounce houses may be fun for kids, but only if they're used correctly, experts caution.

66 children a day treated in US emergency departments for shopping cart-related injuries

January 22, 2014
Although a voluntary shopping cart safety standard was implemented in the United States in 2004, the overall number and rate of injuries to children associated with shopping carts have not decreased. In fact, the number and ...

Baby safety gates aren't always safe, study finds

May 5, 2014
Baby gates meant to protect young children aren't always as safe as parents think. A new study says nearly 2,000 U.S. kids get emergency room treatment each year from injuries resulting from falling through or climbing on ...

Recommended for you

Wine is good for you—to a point

January 18, 2018
The Mediterranean diet has become synonymous with healthy eating, but there's one thing in it that stands out: It's cool to drink wine.

Sleep better, lose weight?

January 17, 2018
(HealthDay)—Sleeplessness could cost you when it's time to stand on your bathroom scale, a new British study suggests.

Who uses phone apps to track sleep habits? Mostly the healthy and wealthy in US

January 16, 2018
The profile of most Americans who use popular mobile phone apps that track sleep habits is that they are relatively affluent, claim to eat well, and say they are in good health, even if some of them tend to smoke.

Improvements in mortality rates are slowed by rise in obesity in the United States

January 15, 2018
With countless medical advances and efforts to curb smoking, one might expect that life expectancy in the United States would improve. Yet according to recent studies, there's been a reduction in the rate of improvement in ...

Teens likely to crave junk food after watching TV ads

January 15, 2018
Teenagers who watch more than three hours of commercial TV a day are more likely to eat hundreds of extra junk food snacks, according to a report by Cancer Research UK.

Can muesli help against arthritis?

January 15, 2018
It is well known that healthy eating increases a general sense of wellbeing. Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now discovered that a fibre-rich diet can have a positive influence ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.