FDA warns that tattoo inks can cause infections

August 7, 2014 by Mary Clare Jalonick

Thinking about getting inked? Check the bottle first.

The Food and Drug Administration is warning tattoo parlors, their customers and those buying at-home tattoo kits that not all tattoo ink is safe.

Last month, California company White and Blue Lion Inc. recalled inks in in-home tattoo kits after testing confirmed in unopened bottles.

At least one has been linked to the company's products, and FDA officials say they are aware of other infections linked to inks with similar packaging.

People getting tattoos can get infections in the skin even in the cleanest conditions. The ink can carry bacteria that can spread through the bloodstream—a process called sepsis. Less severe infections may involve bumps on the skin, discharge, redness, swelling and pain at the site.

Explore further: AAD: Complications of tattoos and tattoo ink discussed

Related Stories

AAD: Complications of tattoos and tattoo ink discussed

March 1, 2013
(HealthDay)—Complications linked to tattoos and tattoo inks include allergic reactions, serious infections, and reactions that can be mistaken for skin cancer, according to information presented at the annual meeting of ...

Tattoos linked to rare skin infection in US

August 10, 2011
At least two men may have come down with a rare bacterial skin infection that is hard to treat with antibiotics after getting tattoos at a store in Seattle, US health authorities said Wednesday.

Want to get rid of that old tattoo? You're not alone

February 9, 2013
(HealthDay)—It seems that tattoos are everywhere these days, but along with the increase in people getting inked, the number of Americans undergoing procedures to have a tattoo removed is also on the rise, experts say.

Tattoo ink found to be source of M. chelonae outbreak

August 23, 2012
(HealthDay)—Premixed tattoo ink has been found to be the source of an outbreak of Mycobacterium chelonae in 19 patients in Rochester, N.Y., according to a study published online Aug. 22 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Coloured tattoos escape ban in France

December 26, 2013
Tattoo artists in France, who were up in arms about a government ban on certain dyes, say the health ministry has reassured them they will be able to keep using coloured ink, attributing the uproar to a misunderstanding of ...

No fumbling, just tap, say Moto X tattoo all-stars (w/ Video)

July 24, 2014
Go ahead with yourselves, U.S. Moto X fan base. Motorola announced Tuesday that owners in the U.S. can buy packs of disposable digital tattoos that will allow them to unlock their phone without any further typing ado. The ...

Recommended for you

A new theory on reducing cardiovascular disease risk in binge drinkers

January 23, 2018
A new study shows that binge drinkers have increased levels of a biomarker molecule—microRNA-21—that may contribute to poor vascular function.

Flu infection study increases understanding of natural immunity

January 23, 2018
People with higher levels of antibodies against the stem portion of the influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) protein have less viral shedding when they get the flu, but do not have fewer or less severe signs of illness, according ...

New long-acting approach for malaria therapy developed

January 22, 2018
A new study, published in Nature Communications, conducted by the University of Liverpool and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine highlights a new 'long acting' medicine for the prevention of malaria.

Virus shown to be likely cause of mystery polio-like illness

January 22, 2018
A major review by UNSW researchers has identified strong evidence that a virus called Enterovirus D68 is the cause of a mystery polio-like illness that has paralysed children in the US, Canada and Europe.

Creation of synthetic horsepox virus could lead to more effective smallpox vaccine

January 19, 2018
UAlberta researchers created a new synthetic virus that could lead to the development of a more effective vaccine against smallpox. The discovery demonstrates how techniques based on the use of synthetic DNA can be used to ...

Study ends debate over role of steroids in treating septic shock

January 19, 2018
The results from the largest ever study of septic shock could improve treatment for critically ill patients and save health systems worldwide hundreds of millions of dollars each year.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.