Overweight mums a concern for caesarian births and hospital planning

August 8, 2014, University of Melbourne

Improving patient care for obese pregnant women giving birth by caesarian and hospital resources for them, is the focus of a new University of Melbourne-led study.

Maternal obesity is associated with increased and has important operating room planning and resource implications for hospitals with maternity services.

Investigator Professor David Story, Chair of Anaesthesia at the University, said the study's fundamental aim was to increase understanding of the best ways to care and plan for giving birth by caesarean, in both metropolitan and regional areas.

"Women with increased body size are twice as likely to have a caesarian delivery."

"Clinical teams have to consider numerous pre-existing medical conditions such as gestational diabetes and pre-eclampsia, a type of during pregnancy," he said.

This study MUM SIZE is a collaboration between seven Victorian hospitals affiliated with the University: the Royal Women's Hospital, Sunshine Hospital, Mercy Hospital for Women, the Northern Hospital, Northeast Health Wangaratta, Ballarat Base Hospital and Shepparton Regional Hospital.

The project will look at the duration of caesarian section operations, using 1,500 patients across seven hospitals and how this affects planning and .

"We know that obese women have an increased risk of complications with a caesarian. The risks and challenges of the procedure increase as the severity of obesity increases," Professor Story said.

"As anaesthesia care is required during the procedure, the anaesthetist becomes an important part of the collaborative care team to ensure both mum and baby are healthy."

"There is a need to revise health policy and guidelines within hospital care as part of a broader trend of a population with increasing rates of obesity among both men and women."

"We are investigating if is associated with increased difficulty with regional anesthesia due to reduced ability to locate anatomical landmarks, increased operative time, increased length of hospital stay and increased use of neonatal services," Professor Story said.

"Respiratory function must always also be monitored in these patients."

Explore further: Childbirth risks not the same for all obese women

Related Stories

Childbirth risks not the same for all obese women

September 10, 2013
Obesity raises the chances of complications and medical interventions in childbirth. But a new study by Oxford University shows the risks are not the same for all obese women.

Pregnant women with high/low BMI are at higher risk of complications and hospital admissions

September 18, 2013
Pregnant women with a body mass index (BMI) that is too high or too low are more likely to have maternal complications, require additional hospital care and incur higher medical costs, according to a new study published today ...

Women with schizophrenia at higher risk of pregnancy and delivery complications

February 3, 2014
Women with schizophrenia are nearly twice as likely to experience pre-eclampsia, pre-term birth and other serious pregnancy and delivery complications as women without the condition, a landmark study by researchers at the ...

Study shows link between sleep apnea and hospital maternal deaths

May 2, 2014
Pregnant women with obstructive sleep apnea are more than five times as likely to die in the hospital than those without the sleep disorder, a comprehensive national study by the University of South Florida researchers found.

Obesity paradox in survival from sepsis

August 5, 2014
University of Michigan Health System researchers revealed an obesity paradox among older Americans suffering from sepsis.

Overweight and obese women at higher risk of adverse neonatal and maternal outcomes

March 26, 2013
Overweight and obese women are more likely to require specialist medical care during their pregnancy due to the increased risk of adverse neonatal and maternal outcomes, finds a new study published today (27 March) in BJOG: ...

Recommended for you

Rise in preterm births linked to clinical intervention

January 18, 2018
Research at the University of Adelaide shows preterm births in South Australia have increased by 40 percent over 28 years and early intervention by medical professionals has resulted in the majority of the increase.

New report calls into question effectiveness of pregnancy anti-nausea drug

January 17, 2018
Previously unpublished information from the clinical trial that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration relied on to approve the most commonly prescribed medicine for nausea in pregnancy indicates the drug is not effective, ...

New study finds 'baby brain' is real, but the cause remains mysterious

January 15, 2018
So-called "baby brain" refers to increased forgetfulness, inattention, and mental "fogginess" reported by four out of five pregnant women. These changes in brain function during pregnancy have long been recognised in midwifery ...

Sleep quality improves with help of incontinence drug

January 12, 2018
A drug used to curtail episodes of urinary incontinence in women also improves quality of sleep, a researcher at the Stanford University School of Medicine reports.

Frozen embryos result in just as many live births in IVF

January 10, 2018
Freezing and subsequent transfer of embryos gives infertile couples just as much of a chance of having a child as using fresh embryos for in vitro fertilization (IVF), research from Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, and Adelaide, ...

Study suggests air pollution breathed in the months before and after conception increases chance of birth defects

January 8, 2018
A team of researchers with the University of Cincinnati and Cincinnati Children's Hospital has found evidence that indicates that pre-and post-pregnant women living in an area with air pollution are at an increased risk of ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.