Video: Imaging the living brain

September 5, 2014, Columbia University

Elizabeth Hillman, associate professor of biomedical engineering, leads a team that is developing new imaging methods for the living brain. Their goal is to understand the way that the brain functions and regulates its blood flow, which can provide important clues to understanding early brain development, disease and aging.

The brain increases local when neurons fire, and this increase is what is detected by a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scan. Hillman's team has found that a layer of cells is capable of propagating signals important to increasing blood flow in the brain.

Explore further: Brain power: New insight into how the brain regulates its blood flow

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TheMatrixDNA
not rated yet Sep 08, 2014
You need to know the natural formula, the universal pattern, that underlies each brain movement, so, from the complex messy, you could identificate and isolating these movements. Any idea, any thought, obeys the life's cycle process, so thoughts are born, developing, degenerating, dying, and going or not going to be memorized. It happens that this process designs a sequential circuit which is the foundations of any systems, its beginnings and its ends. The Matrix/DNA Theory has the formula, it should be good that researchers knows about that. We have found that the first initial state of that formula is pure natural waves of light, We have noting that synapses are kind of electric impulses, Our suspicion is that phenomena linked to light dimension underlies and drives the state of blood circulation. But, without seeing the process of life's cycle encrypted inside any light motion, the researchers will not develops the right technology for researching..

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