Video: Imaging the living brain

September 5, 2014, Columbia University

Elizabeth Hillman, associate professor of biomedical engineering, leads a team that is developing new imaging methods for the living brain. Their goal is to understand the way that the brain functions and regulates its blood flow, which can provide important clues to understanding early brain development, disease and aging.

The brain increases local when neurons fire, and this increase is what is detected by a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scan. Hillman's team has found that a layer of cells is capable of propagating signals important to increasing blood flow in the brain.

Explore further: Brain power: New insight into how the brain regulates its blood flow

Related Stories

Brain power: New insight into how the brain regulates its blood flow

June 12, 2014
In a new study published online in the Journal of the American Heart Association, researchers at Columbia Engineering report that they have identified a new component of the biological mechanism that controls blood flow in ...

Shedding new light on infant brain development

February 18, 2013
(Medical Xpress)—A new study by Columbia Engineering researchers finds that the infant brain does not control its blood flow in the same way as the adult brain. The paper, which the scientists say could change the way researchers ...

Cell-saving drugs could reduce brain damage after stroke

March 26, 2014
Long-term brain damage caused by stroke could be reduced by saving cells called pericytes that control blood flow in capillaries, reports a new study led by scientists from University College London.

Are three brain imaging techniques better than one?

August 22, 2014
(Medical Xpress)—Many recent imaging studies have shown that in children with autism, different parts of the brain do not connect with each other in typical ways. Initially, most researchers thought that the autistic brain ...

Scientists map the pulse pressure and elasticity of arteries in the brain

August 18, 2014
Researchers at the Beckman Institute at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technique that can noninvasively image the pulse pressure and elasticity of the arteries of the brain, revealing ...

Recommended for you

Genomic dark matter activity connects Parkinson's and psychiatric diseases

September 20, 2018
Dopamine neurons are located in the midbrain, but their tendril-like axons can branch far into the higher cortical areas, influencing how we move and how we feel. New genetic evidence has revealed that these specialized cells ...

'Gut sense' is hardwired, not hormonal

September 20, 2018
If you've ever felt nauseous before an important presentation, or foggy after a big meal, then you know the power of the gut-brain connection.

Full, but still feasting: Mouse study reveals how urge to eat overpowers a signal to stop

September 20, 2018
Almost everyone knows the feeling. You're at a restaurant or a holiday meal, and your stomach is telling you it's full, so logically you know you should stop eating.

White matter repair and traumatic brain injury

September 20, 2018
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability in the U.S., contributing to about 30 percent of all injury deaths, according to the CDC. TBI causes damage to both white and gray matter in the brain, ...

Gut branches of vagus nerve essential components of brain's reward and motivation system

September 20, 2018
A novel gut-to-brain neural circuit establishes the vagus nerve as an essential component of the brain system that regulates reward and motivation, according to research conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount ...

Gambling monkeys help scientists find brain area linked to high-risk behavior

September 20, 2018
Monkeys who learned how to gamble have helped researchers pinpoint an area of the brain key to one's willingness to make risky decisions.

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

TheMatrixDNA
not rated yet Sep 08, 2014
You need to know the natural formula, the universal pattern, that underlies each brain movement, so, from the complex messy, you could identificate and isolating these movements. Any idea, any thought, obeys the life's cycle process, so thoughts are born, developing, degenerating, dying, and going or not going to be memorized. It happens that this process designs a sequential circuit which is the foundations of any systems, its beginnings and its ends. The Matrix/DNA Theory has the formula, it should be good that researchers knows about that. We have found that the first initial state of that formula is pure natural waves of light, We have noting that synapses are kind of electric impulses, Our suspicion is that phenomena linked to light dimension underlies and drives the state of blood circulation. But, without seeing the process of life's cycle encrypted inside any light motion, the researchers will not develops the right technology for researching..

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.