Peanut in household dust linked to peanut allergy in children with eczema during infancy

November 18, 2014, King's College London

A new study led by researchers at King's College London in collaboration with the US Consortium of Food Allergy Research and the University of Dundee has found a strong link between environmental exposure to peanut protein during infancy (measured in household dust) and an allergic response to peanuts in children who have eczema early in life.

Around two per cent of school children in the UK and the US are allergic to peanuts. Severe eczema in early infancy has been linked to food allergies, particularly .

The study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, looked at the amount of infants aged 3-15 months were exposed to in , by vacuuming dust from the living room and measuring peanut in the dust. The study was conducted in 359 children who had a high risk of developing peanut allergy because they were allergic to cow's milk or egg or had moderate to severe eczema and had tested positive for an allergy to cow's milk or egg.

The study found that exposure to peanut in dust early in life doubled the risk of peanut allergy. In children with a history of eczema, the risk of peanut allergy increased further.

Dr Helen A Brough, first author from the Department of Paediatric Allergy, King's College London, said: "This study adds to the growing body of evidence that exposure to peanut via a damaged skin barrier may increase the risk of peanut allergy. Previous studies have shown, for example, that infants with eczema treated with creams containing peanut oil in the first six months of life had a higher risk of developing peanut allergy later in life."

Professor Gideon Lack, senior author from the Department of Paediatric Allergy, King's College London, said: "This is further evidence for the dual-allergen-exposure theory which suggests food allergies develop through exposure to allergens via the skin, likely through a disrupted skin barrier, whilst consumption of these food proteins early in life builds up tolerance in the body. Previous guidelines recommending that mothers should avoid peanuts during pregnancy and breastfeeding have now been withdrawn. It may be that the timing and balance of skin and oral exposure to a particular food early in life determines whether a child develops an allergy or tolerance to that ."

Explore further: Peanut in house dust linked to peanut allergy in children with skin gene mutation

Related Stories

Peanut in house dust linked to peanut allergy in children with skin gene mutation

October 21, 2014
A new study led by researchers at King's College London in collaboration with the University of Manchester and the University of Dundee has found a strong link between exposure to peanut protein in household dust during infancy ...

Skin exposure may contribute to early risk for food allergies

October 8, 2014
Many children may become allergic to peanuts before they first eat them, and skin exposure may be contribute to early sensitization, according to a study in mice led by Mount Sinai researchers and published today in the Journal ...

Dry roasting could help trigger peanut allergy

September 21, 2014
Dry roasted peanuts are more likely to trigger an allergy to peanuts than raw peanuts, suggests an Oxford University study involving mice.

Food allergy development linked to skin exposure

November 3, 2014
Food allergies are on the rise in the U.S. and other developed countries. In patients, food allergies appear as a variety of symptoms, ranging from mild skin inflammation to severe asthma. Recent studies suggest that contact ...

Pregnant women need not avoid peanuts, evidence shows

December 23, 2013
Women need not fear that eating peanuts during pregnancy could cause their child to develop a peanut allergy, according to a new study from Boston Children's Hospital published online Dec. 23 in JAMA Pediatrics.

The great disappearing act: Bone marrow receiver cured of allergy

November 8, 2013
Not only can bone marrow transplants be life-saving for children with acute lymphocytic leukemia, they may also cure peanut allergies. According to research presented during the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology's ...

Recommended for you

Paracetamol use in infancy is linked to increased risk of asthma in some teenagers

September 17, 2018
Children who take paracetamol during their first two years of life may be at a higher risk of developing asthma by the age of 18, especially if they have a particular genetic makeup, according to new research presented at ...

Cord blood clue to respiratory diseases

September 15, 2018
New research has found children born in the last three months of the year in Melbourne may have a greater risk of developing respiratory diseases such as asthma.

FRESH program combines basic science with social benefits for women at risk of HIV

September 14, 2018
A program established by investigators from the Ragon Institute of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), MIT and Harvard is addressing the persistently elevated risk of HIV infection among young women in South Africa from ...

Dietary fiber reduces brain inflammation during aging

September 14, 2018
As mammals age, immune cells in the brain known as microglia become chronically inflamed. In this state, they produce chemicals known to impair cognitive and motor function. That's one explanation for why memory fades and ...

Research reveals link between immunity, diabetes

September 14, 2018
When it comes to diet-induced obesity, your immune system is not always your friend.

Immune response mechanism described for fate determination of T cells

September 13, 2018
After a pathogen infects the body, the immune system responds with a remarkable—and remarkably complicated—cascade of events.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.