Delicate magnolia scent activates human pheromone receptor

The question if humans can communicate via pheromones in the same way as animals is under debate. Cell physiologists at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum have demonstrated that the odorous substance Hedione activates the putative pheromone receptor VN1R1, which occurs in the human olfactory epithelium. Together with colleagues from Dresden, the Bochum-based researchers showed that the scent of Hedione generates sex-specific activation patters in the brain, which do not occur with traditional fragrances.

"These results constitute compelling evidence that a pheromone effect different from normal olfactory perception indeed exists in humans," says scent researcher Prof Dr Dr Dr Hanns Hatt. The team published the results in the journal NeuroImage.

Hedione activates pheromone receptor in olfactory epithelium

Using genetic-analysis approaches, the researchers from Bochum confirmed the pheromone receptor's existence in human olfactory mucosa. Subsequently, they transferred the genetic code for the receptor into cell cultures and, using these cells, demonstrated that Hedione activates the receptor. Hedione – derived from the Greek word "hedone", for fun, pleasure, lust – has a pleasant fresh jasmine-magnolia scent and is utilised in many perfumes. It is also called the scent of success.

Sex-specific brain activation may be related to the release of sex hormones

Together with the team headed by Prof Dr med Thomas Hummel from the University Hospital Dresden, the group from Bochum analysed what happens in the brain when a person smells Hedione. They compared the results with the effects triggered by phenylethyl alcohol, a traditional floral fragrance. Hedione activated brain areas in the limbic system significantly more strongly than phenylethyl alcohol. The limbic system is associated with emotions, memory and motivation. In addition, Hedione activated a specific hypothalamic region, in women more strongly than in men. This activation pattern is typical for controlling sexual behaviour via the endocrine system.

Next steps are in progress

"In the next stage, we want to find out which physiological and psychological parameters are affected when Hedione activates the pheromone receptor," explains Hanns Hatt. "We have already launched the relevant studies. But we also have to search for scent molecules in bodily secretions, which resemble Hedione and activate the receptor. With its help, humans could actually communicate with each other."

Pheromone receptors in humans and animals

Pheromones are substances that facilitate chemical communication between members of the same species. They trigger a homogenous, repeatable reaction. In the animal kingdom, this kind of communication is very widespread. Mice have approx. 300 different genes for pheromone receptors; in humans, probably only five of them are still functional. Most mammals have a special organ located at the base of the nasal septum, i.e. the vomeronasal organ. According to contemporary research this organ fulfils no function in humans anymore. However, researchers at RUB and other institutes have demonstrated in the recent years that may also occur in the in humans and in mice.


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More information: "The smelling of Hedione results in sex-differentiated human brain activity," Neuroimage, DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.03.029
Journal information: NeuroImage

Citation: Delicate magnolia scent activates human pheromone receptor (2015, April 9) retrieved 20 May 2019 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2015-04-delicate-magnolia-scent-human-pheromone.html
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JVK
Apr 09, 2015
Re: "The question if humans can communicate via pheromones in the same way as animals is under debate."

There is no debate among serious scientists who understand the fact that epigenetic effects on cell type differentiation are nutrient-dependent, RNA-mediated, and pheromone-controlled in species from microbes to man. That fact has been detailed in the following series of published works.

From Fertilization to Adult Sexual Behavior http://www.hawaii...ion.html

Human pheromones: integrating neuroendocrinology and ethology http://www.nel.ed...ward.htm

The Mind's Eyes: Human pheromones, neuroscience, and male sexual preferences http://www.sexarc...kohl.htm

Human pheromones and food odors: epigenetic influences on the socioaffective nature of evolved behaviors. http://www.ncbi.n...24693349

JVK
Apr 09, 2015
Nutrient-dependent/pheromone-controlled adaptive evolution: a model. http://www.ncbi.n...24693353

Human pheromones, epigenetics, physiology, and the development of animal behavior http://f1000.com/...ary/1387

When he was wearing the mixture compared to when he wore the diluent, women were more likely to make eye contact (t (12) = 3.43, p = 0.01; IRR: r = 0.964, p = 0.01). They also laughed more (t (12) = 5.20, p < 0.01; IRR: r = 0.810, p = 0.01), and they subsequently rated themselves as being more attracted to him (t (12) = 2.786, p = 0.016).Our results combine the known effects of androstenol on LH and on mood with a likely behavioral affect of androsterone.

Pheromones.com http://pheromones.com/

PerfumingtheMind.com http://perfumingthemind.com/

RNA-mediated.com http://rna-mediated.com/

RNA-mediated events link the pheromone-controlled physiology of reproduction via food odors to metabolic networks and genetic networks.

Apr 10, 2015
Re: "The question if humans can communicate via pheromones in the same way as animals is under debate."

There is no debate among serious scientists who understand the fact that epigenetic effects on cell type differentiation are nutrient-dependent, RNA-mediated, and pheromone-controlled in species from microbes to man. That fact has been detailed in the following series of published works.

That "fact" has been claimed by YOU. Provide a link independently confirming your "fact", peer reviewed of course.

JVK
Apr 10, 2015
Provide a link independently confirming your "fact", peer reviewed of course.


Feedback loops link odor and pheromone signaling with reproduction http://www.scienc...05009815

There are more than 1000 blog posts at the following domains.
Pheromones.com http://pheromones.com/
PerfumingtheMind.com http://perfumingthemind.com/
RNA-mediated.com http://rna-mediated.com/

The posts attest to the facts about pheromones and cell type differentiation that were included in our 1996 Hormones and Behavior review. The experimental evidence doesn't prove that food odors exist or that human pheromones exist, but all evidence of biologically-based cause and effect attests to the fact that the pathway that links food odors and pheromones to hormones that affect behavior is the same in all vertebrates.

From Fertilization to Adult Sexual Behavior http://www.hawaii...ion.html

JVK
Apr 10, 2015
Kohl (2012) Excerpt: "The definition of pheromones infers that they alter behavior by altering levels of hormones, which organize and activate developmental processes. In essence, pheromones are species-specific chemicals (e.g. social odors) that effect hormones, which cause behavioral affects."

Wallrabenstein et al (2015) Excerpt: "Social odors" or pheromones are defined as chemicals that are released from one animal and evoke a change in the behavior or hormone system of another animal of the same species (Karlson and Luscher, 1959). Human chemosensory communication is highly complex and controversial (Wysocki and Preti, 2004)."

Serious scientists attest to the complexity of human communication with pheromones. That complexity overwhelms people like Wysocki and Preti. Those who do not understand the fact that "Life is physics and chemistry and communication" http://dx.doi.org...as.12570 are not likely to grasp the facts about human pheromones.

JVK
Apr 10, 2015
See also: http://phys.org/n...ria.html]http://phys.org/n...ria.html[/url] http://phys.org/n...ria.html]http://phys.org/n...ria.html[/url]

Re: Ecological adaptation revolves around conserved molecular mechanisms of RNA-mediated events.

In Kohl (2013) I wrote: "...ingested plant microRNAs influence gene expression across kingdoms (Zhang et al., 2012). In mammals, this epigenetically links what mammals eat to changes in gene expression (McNulty et al., 2011) and to new genes required for the evolutionary development of the mammalian placenta (Lynch, Leclerc, May, & Wagner, 2011) and the human brain..."

Wallrabenstein et al (2015) link nutrient-dependent changes in the microRNA/messenger RNA (mRNA) balance to human communication with pheromones.

"3.1. mRNA of all intact VN1Rs is present in human olfactory mucosa" See: 3.2.

"Genetic variations of chemoreceptors caused by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that result in an amino acid change..."

JVK
Apr 10, 2015
This genome-wide association study revealed "...a striking link between mitotic aneuploidy and a single nucleotide variant (SNP rs2305957) on chromosome 4 of maternal genomes." http://www.the-sc...gnancy-/

My model links this fact from RNA-mediated events to natural selection based on food odors and the metabolism of nutrients to species-specific pheromones that control fixation of amino acid substitutions in the context of the nutrient-dependent physiology of reproduction.

For comparison to RNA-mediated biologically-based cause and effect, when placed into the context of evolutionary theory, these "...findings seem "so paradoxical," said Green, "I fear that any theory one can come up with is going to feel wrong in some way."

Any theory will be wrong compared to any model that incorporates what is known: "Feedback loops link odor and pheromone signaling with reproduction" Boehm et al. (2005)

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