Neuroscience

Scientists discover mood-altering brain receptor

International research has uncovered a receptor believed to be linked to negative moods, in a part of the brain that is little-understood. The discovery published in Science could lead to more targeted medications.

Oncology & Cancer

Protein decoy stymies lung cancer growth in mice, study finds

Scientists at Stanford and UC-San Francisco have developed an experimental drug that targets a currently untreatable type of lung cancer responsible for generating roughly 500,000 newly diagnosed cases worldwide each year.

Medical research

Here's something that will raise your blood pressure

Many questions remain about the mechanisms that control blood pressure, particularly in relation to hypertension. Among the factors involved in regulation of blood vessel behavior, the apelin receptor (APJ) has been presumed ...

Medications

What time of day should I take my medicine?

Whether you need to take a drug at a specific time of day depends on the medication and the condition you are treating. For some medicines, it doesn't matter what time you take it. And for others, the pharmacist may recommend ...

Diabetes

Key mechanism in insulin release by cholesterol metabolite

Insulin which is released by pancreatic beta-cells is the main regulator of blood sugar. Previous and current studies by a research group at Lund University in Sweden have identified around hundred different receptors on ...

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Receptor (biochemistry)

In biochemistry, a receptor is a protein molecule, embedded in either the plasma membrane or cytoplasm of a cell, to which a mobile signaling (or "signal") molecule may attach. A molecule which binds to a receptor is called a "ligand," and may be a peptide (such as a neurotransmitter), a hormone, a pharmaceutical drug, or a toxin, and when such binding occurs, the receptor undergoes a conformational change which ordinarily initiates a cellular response. However, some ligands merely block receptors without inducing any response (e.g. antagonists). Ligand-induced changes in receptors result in physiological changes which constitute the biological activity of the ligands.

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