Oncology & Cancer

Pushing T cells down 'memory lane' may improve cancer therapy

Scientists at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital identified a molecular mechanism that in a preclinical study unlocked the promise of CAR T-cell therapy for treatment of solid tumors. The results were published today in ...

Oncology & Cancer

Breakthrough study of hormone 'cross-talk' in breast cancer

Scientists led by EPFL have successfully engrafted breast cancer cells on mice, allowing them to study in vivo the cross-talk between the estrogen and progesterone receptors that hampers hormone therapies. Their findings ...

Health

Keep cool to be heart-healthy in extreme heat

Record high temperatures are bringing summer heat early this year around much of the U.S., and the American Heart Association, a global force for longer, healthier lives for all, is urging people to take extra steps to protect ...

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Receptor (biochemistry)

In biochemistry, a receptor is a protein molecule, embedded in either the plasma membrane or cytoplasm of a cell, to which a mobile signaling (or "signal") molecule may attach. A molecule which binds to a receptor is called a "ligand," and may be a peptide (such as a neurotransmitter), a hormone, a pharmaceutical drug, or a toxin, and when such binding occurs, the receptor undergoes a conformational change which ordinarily initiates a cellular response. However, some ligands merely block receptors without inducing any response (e.g. antagonists). Ligand-induced changes in receptors result in physiological changes which constitute the biological activity of the ligands.

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