Cancer

Estrogen receptors might hold key in obesity prevention

Despite countless fad diets, both obesity and metabolic diseases continue to plague communities across the U.S. Now, researchers from the University of Missouri believe that the clue to treatment might be related to estrogen—for ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Researchers have identified the first human-specific fusion gene

University at Buffalo researchers have identified the first human-specific fusion gene—a hybrid of two genes—implicated in Alzheimer's disease. The finding suggests that a neurotransmitter receptor, previously successful ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Fighting staph infections with the body's immune system

Researchers have gained a greater understanding of the biology of staphylococcus skin infections in mice and how the mouse immune system mobilizes to fight them. A study appears this week in the PNAS. Community acquired methicillin-resistant ...

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Receptor (biochemistry)

In biochemistry, a receptor is a protein molecule, embedded in either the plasma membrane or cytoplasm of a cell, to which a mobile signaling (or "signal") molecule may attach. A molecule which binds to a receptor is called a "ligand," and may be a peptide (such as a neurotransmitter), a hormone, a pharmaceutical drug, or a toxin, and when such binding occurs, the receptor undergoes a conformational change which ordinarily initiates a cellular response. However, some ligands merely block receptors without inducing any response (e.g. antagonists). Ligand-induced changes in receptors result in physiological changes which constitute the biological activity of the ligands.

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