Oncology & Cancer

New vaccine strategy boosts T-cell therapy

A promising new way to treat some types of cancer is to program the patient's own T cells to destroy the cancerous cells. This approach, termed CAR-T cell therapy, is now used to combat some types of leukemia, but so far ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Puzzling brain disease could now be better diagnosed, treated

Scientists have developed an animal model that may provide a path toward improving the diagnosis and treatment of the devastating brain disease chronicled in the bestselling autobiography "Brain on Fire." The book, along ...

Oncology & Cancer

Confining cell-killing treatments to tumors

Cytokines, small proteins released by immune cells to communicate with each other, have for some time been investigated as a potential cancer treatment.

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Receptor (biochemistry)

In biochemistry, a receptor is a protein molecule, embedded in either the plasma membrane or cytoplasm of a cell, to which a mobile signaling (or "signal") molecule may attach. A molecule which binds to a receptor is called a "ligand," and may be a peptide (such as a neurotransmitter), a hormone, a pharmaceutical drug, or a toxin, and when such binding occurs, the receptor undergoes a conformational change which ordinarily initiates a cellular response. However, some ligands merely block receptors without inducing any response (e.g. antagonists). Ligand-induced changes in receptors result in physiological changes which constitute the biological activity of the ligands.

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