AASLD updates guidance for use of hepatitis C drugs

June 25, 2015, Wiley
Electron micrographs of hepatitis C virus purified from cell culture. Scale bar is 50 nanometers. Credit: Center for the Study of Hepatitis C, The Rockefeller University.

The American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD), in partnership with the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and in collaboration with the International Antiviral Society-USA (IAS-USA), created online Recommendations for Testing, Managing, and Treating Hepatitis C in 2014 to aid practitioners treating patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Now an update to the Guidance, with a summary of recommendations regarding treatment with direct-acting antiviral drugs, is published in the AASLD journal, Hepatology.

HCV is a blood-borne virus that infects the liver and may lead to cirrhosis or liver cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma). In the past 25 years HCV has gone from an undiagnosed disease to an epidemic level, with the World Health Organization (WHO) estimating that up to 150 million people worldwide live with chronic disease.

In the U.S., close to 30,000 new acute cases were reported in 2013 and 2.7 million Americans have chronic HCV according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). "The good news is that HCV is now on the cusp of being a curable disease for the millions of Americans, many of whom are undiagnosed," says Dr. Gary Davis, President of MedLogician Consulting and co-chair of the AASLD/IDSA HCV Guidance writing panel. "The web-based Guidance document is an easy-to-use resource for practitioners treating HCV with novel antivirals."

A panel of 26 hepatologists and infectious diseases specialists and a patient advocate developed the original consensus recommendations that include:

  • HCV testing details and linkage to care
  • Recommendations for initial treatment of HCV infection in patients starting treatment
  • Retreatment information in persons in whom prior therapy has failed
  • Unique patient populations data

"The Guidance is a living document that will continually be updated with evidence-based advice about how to best use the next generation of direct-acting antivirals and other treatment options," comments Dr. Keith Lindor from the Arizona State University and President-elect of AASLD. "Our role as associations of researchers and clinicians is to provide key information in the appropriate format to patients and those who care for them."

Explore further: Hepatitis C screening essential to help catch patients with advanced liver fibrosis

More information: "Hepatitis C Guidance: AASLD-IDSA Recommendations for Testing, Managing, and Treating Adults Infected with Hepatitis C Virus." Authors on behalf of the Hepatitis C Guidance Panel (see AASLD/IDSA HCV Guidance panel members and authors). Hepatology; Published Online: June 25, 2015, DOI: 10.1002/hep.27950

Related Stories

Hepatitis C screening essential to help catch patients with advanced liver fibrosis

April 25, 2015
Study results presented today at The International Liver Congress 2015 show that the occurrence of advanced liver fibrosis is similar for patients infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV), whether or not they have been diagnosed.

Transmission of hepatitis C virus following antiviral treatment

July 8, 2014
Millions of people throughout the world are infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Left untreated, infection results in serious complications such as cirrhosis of the liver and cancer. Many HCV-infected patients respond well ...

Studies show effectiveness of combo treatment for HCV patients with, without cirrhosis

May 5, 2015
In two studies appearing in the May 5 issue of JAMA, patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infection and with or without cirrhosis achieved high rates of sustained virologic response after 12 weeks of treatment ...

All-oral, DAA options for HCV effective and well tolerated in patients with decompensated cirrhosis

April 23, 2015
Interim data presented today at The International Liver Congress 2015 from the HCV-TARGET study show that all-oral, direct-acting antiviral therapy for hepatitis C (HCV) is well tolerated and highly effective in patients ...

Ledipasvir-sofosbuvir combination proves effective in subset of patients with chronic hepatitis C

April 24, 2015
A new study presented today at The International Liver Congress 2015 has demonstrated that ledipasvir (LDV) in combination with sofosbuvir (SOF) achieves sustained virologic response rates 12 weeks after treatment (SVR12; ...

Predicting the outcome of hepatitis C virus treatment

July 1, 2014
Millions of people throughout the world are infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), which can lead to cirrhosis of the liver and cancer. Directly acting antiviral agents inhibit viral proteins and have been used to successfully ...

Recommended for you

Scientists make significant discovery in the fight against drug-resistant tuberculosis

September 20, 2018
A team of scientists have identified a naturally occurring antibiotic that may help in the fight against drug-resistant Tuberculosis.

Anti-cancer drugs may hold key to overcoming antimalarial drug resistance

September 20, 2018
Scientists have found a way to boost the efficacy of the world's most powerful antimalarial drug with the help of chemotherapy medicines, according to new research published in the journal Nature Communications.

Affordable Care Act: Study finds surprising gaps in HIV care providers' knowledge

September 20, 2018
A new study has revealed surprising gaps in some HIV medical providers' knowledge of the Affordable Care Act, with more than a quarter of providers surveyed unable to say whether their state had expanded Medicaid.

Preventing a dengue outbreak at the 2020 Summer Olympics

September 20, 2018
In 2014, a dengue outbreak unexpectedly occurred in Tokyo. What does that mean for the 2020 summer Olympics and Paralympics being held in the city? Researchers report this week in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases that new ...

Researchers discover influenza virus doesn't replicate equally in all cells

September 19, 2018
The seasonal flu is caused by different subtypes of Influenza A virus and typically leads to the death of half a million people each year. In order to better understand this virus and how it spreads, University of Minnesota ...

Flu season forecasts could be more accurate with access to health care companies' data

September 19, 2018
In an era when for-profit companies collect a wealth of data about us, new research from The University of Texas at Austin shows that data collected by health care companies could—if made available to researchers and public ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.