Researchers link spatial neglect after stroke with poor outcomes

Using the Kessler Foundation Neglect Assessment Process (KF-NAP), Kessler researchers found a high rate of spatial neglect among inpatients with stroke. Affected patients had a higher risk for falls, longer lengths of stay and lesser likelihood of returning home after discharge.

"Impact of Spatial Neglect on Stroke Rehabilitation: Evidence from the Setting of an Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility" was published in the Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation. The authors are Peii Chen, PhD, and A.M. Barrett, MD, of Kessler Foundation, and Kimberly Hreha, MS, and Yekyung Kong, MD, of Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation.

Of 108 stroke patients screened at admission with the KF-NAP, 68.4% had spatial neglect. This complication was more common and more severe after right brain stroke. "Higher KF-NAP scores were associated with lower FIM scores and prolonged recovery during rehabilitation," said Peii Chen, PhD, research scientist. "Falls were 6.5 times more likely in the group with spatial neglect and hospital stays were 10 days longer. Moreover, people with spatial neglect were 45% less likely to be discharged home. To lessen this negative impact on outcomes, screening for spatial neglect and specific early intervention are essential."


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Stroke researchers report uniqueness of KF-NAP for assessing spatial neglect after stroke

More information: DOI: 10.1016/j.apmr2015.03.019
Provided by Kessler Foundation
Citation: Researchers link spatial neglect after stroke with poor outcomes (2015, September 29) retrieved 21 July 2019 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2015-09-link-spatial-neglect-poor-outcomes.html
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