Hearing aids may help keep hearing-impaired older adults mentally sharp

October 19, 2015, Wiley

Hearing loss is linked with accelerated cognitive decline in older adults, but the use of hearing aids may help safeguard seniors' memory and thinking skills.

In a study of 137 with major hearing loss, 1139 with moderate problems, and 2394 with no hearing trouble, hearing loss was significantly associated with greater cognitive decline scores at the start of the study and during a 25-year follow-up period. Participants with hearing loss, but not those with hearing loss who used , had greater declines in cognitive function during follow-up compared with controls.

The results are published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Explore further: Cochlear implantation improved speech perception, cognitive function in older adults

More information: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, DOI: 10.1111/jgs.13649

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