Hearing aids may help keep hearing-impaired older adults mentally sharp

October 19, 2015, Wiley

Hearing loss is linked with accelerated cognitive decline in older adults, but the use of hearing aids may help safeguard seniors' memory and thinking skills.

In a study of 137 with major hearing loss, 1139 with moderate problems, and 2394 with no hearing trouble, hearing loss was significantly associated with greater cognitive decline scores at the start of the study and during a 25-year follow-up period. Participants with hearing loss, but not those with hearing loss who used , had greater declines in cognitive function during follow-up compared with controls.

The results are published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Explore further: Cochlear implantation improved speech perception, cognitive function in older adults

More information: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, DOI: 10.1111/jgs.13649

Related Stories

Cochlear implantation improved speech perception, cognitive function in older adults

March 12, 2015
Cochlear implantation was associated with improved speech perception and cognitive function in adults 65 years or older with profound hearing loss, according to a report published online by JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck ...

Silently suffering from hearing loss negatively affects quality of life

August 7, 2015
Hearing loss in adults is under treated despite evidence that hearing aid technology can significantly lessen depression and anxiety and improve cognitive functioning, according to a presentation at the American Psychological ...

Hearing-aid intervention helps individuals gradually adjust to devices

January 20, 2015
When individuals wear their hearing aids for the first time, they are flooded with sounds they have not heard in months or years; yet, previous research has shown that not all new sounds are welcomed. Ambient noises such ...

Hearing aid use in children with mild loss improves speech

April 6, 2014
(HealthDay)—The level of hearing improvement achieved by hearing aid (HA) use in children correlates with better speech and language development, according to a study published online April 3 in JAMA Otolaryngology.

Implanted hearing device approved

March 20, 2014
(HealthDay)—The first implantable device for adults with a severe or profound form of a condition called "sensorineural hearing loss" has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Hearing loss tied to depression in study

March 7, 2014
(HealthDay)—Hearing loss is associated with depression among American adults, especially women and those younger than age 70, according to new research.

Recommended for you

Self-control and obesity: Gender matters in children

July 16, 2018
A toddler's self-regulation—the ability to change behavior in different social situations—may predict whether he or she will be obese come kindergarten, but the connection appears to be much different for girls than for ...

1 in 9 U.S. adults over 45 reports memory problems

July 13, 2018
(HealthDay)—If you're middle-aged and you think you're losing your memory, you're not alone, a new U.S. government report shows.

Antioxidant benefits of sleep

July 12, 2018
Understanding sleep has become increasingly important in modern society, where chronic loss of sleep has become rampant and pervasive. As evidence mounts for a correlation between lack of sleep and negative health effects, ...

Footwear habits influence child and adolescent motor skill development

July 11, 2018
New research finds that children and adolescents who spend most of their time barefoot develop motor skills differently from those who habitually wear shoes. Published in Frontiers in Pediatrics, this is the first study to ...

How a Mediterranean diet could reduce osteoporosis

July 11, 2018
Eating a Mediterranean-type diet could reduce bone loss in people with osteoporosis—according to new research from the University of East Anglia.

Extreme heat and reduced cognitive performance in adults in non-air-conditioned buildings

July 10, 2018
Students who lived in dormitories without air conditioning (AC) during a heat wave performed worse on a series of cognitive tests compared with students who lived in air-conditioned dorms, according to new research led by ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.