Robotics exoskeleton for shoulder rehabilitation

January 20, 2016, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid
Robotics exoskeleton for shoulder rehabilitation
Exoskeleton designed by CAR (UPM-CSIC). Credit: UPM

A team from the Centre for Automation and Robotics (CAR, UPM-CSIC) has developed a robotic exoskeleton for efficient rehabilitation therapies for patients with shoulder injuries. By using strength and motion sensors, the system assesses the degree of an injury and its evolution as the treatment progresses.

Additionally, the use of this is simple and easily adaptable to any patient. These features represent not only a great advantage for patients, who recover faster, but also for healthcare providers who treat these injuries every day.

The human shoulder is one of the most complex joints in the human body, due to its wide variety of motions. The interrelationship among its parts makes rehabilitation complex after an injury when compared to other skeletal-muscle injuries.

Rehabilitation therapies performed by intelligent have been shown to reduce patients' recovery time. However, there are very few robotic systems for recovery of shoulder injuries. Thus, researchers from CAR have developed a that, apart from lessening the of an injury, assesses and registers the progress of the entire rehabilitation process.

According to the main researcher, Cecilia García Cena, simulating the skeletal system is not enough to develop this exoskeleton. It also needed to incorporate the kinematics and dynamics of a complete model that accounts for the skeletal system, muscles, tendons and ligaments. All these elements are included in the new intelligent robotic system.

The exoskeleton is inexpensive, easy to use and adaptable to any patient. This system can help to relieve saturated rehabilitation units, with the consequent saving in the healthcare system.

Explore further: Researchers developing soft robotic glove for post-stroke hand rehabilitation

Related Stories

Researchers developing soft robotic glove for post-stroke hand rehabilitation

August 7, 2015
Initial rehabilitation therapy for many stroke victims may focus on regaining the ability to walk. But when hands also are affected, therapy focused only on the legs can leave hand muscles contracted, a condition that can ...

Recommended for you

In a break with dogma, myelin boosts neuron growth in spinal cord injuries

May 23, 2018
Recovery after severe spinal cord injury is notoriously fraught, with permanent paralysis often the result. In recent years, researchers have increasingly turned to stem cell-based therapies as a potential method for repairing ...

Memory molecule limits plasticity by calibrating calcium

May 23, 2018
The brain has an incredible capacity to support a lifetime of learning and memory. Each new experience fundamentally alters the connections between cells in the brain called synapses. To accommodate synaptic alterations, ...

New type of vertigo identified

May 23, 2018
Neurologists have identified a new type of vertigo with no known cause, according to a study published in the May 23, 2018, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Changes to specific MicroRNA involved in development of Lou Gehrig's disease

May 23, 2018
A new Tel Aviv University study identifies a previously unknown mechanism involved in the development of Lou Gehrig's disease, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The research focuses on a specific microRNA whose levels ...

Study confirms that men and women tend to adopt different navigation strategies

May 23, 2018
When navigating in a known environment, men prefer to take shortcuts to reach their destination more quickly, while women tend to use routes they know. This is according to Alexander Boone of UC Santa Barbara in the US who ...

Mechanisms of harmful overhydration and brain swelling

May 22, 2018
We are all familiar with the drawbacks of dehydration, but we rarely hear about the harmful effects of overhydration. For one, excess fluid accumulation can lead to dangerously low sodium levels in the blood or hyponatremia—a ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.