Robotics exoskeleton for shoulder rehabilitation

January 20, 2016, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid
Robotics exoskeleton for shoulder rehabilitation
Exoskeleton designed by CAR (UPM-CSIC). Credit: UPM

A team from the Centre for Automation and Robotics (CAR, UPM-CSIC) has developed a robotic exoskeleton for efficient rehabilitation therapies for patients with shoulder injuries. By using strength and motion sensors, the system assesses the degree of an injury and its evolution as the treatment progresses.

Additionally, the use of this is simple and easily adaptable to any patient. These features represent not only a great advantage for patients, who recover faster, but also for healthcare providers who treat these injuries every day.

The human shoulder is one of the most complex joints in the human body, due to its wide variety of motions. The interrelationship among its parts makes rehabilitation complex after an injury when compared to other skeletal-muscle injuries.

Rehabilitation therapies performed by intelligent have been shown to reduce patients' recovery time. However, there are very few robotic systems for recovery of shoulder injuries. Thus, researchers from CAR have developed a that, apart from lessening the of an injury, assesses and registers the progress of the entire rehabilitation process.

According to the main researcher, Cecilia García Cena, simulating the skeletal system is not enough to develop this exoskeleton. It also needed to incorporate the kinematics and dynamics of a complete model that accounts for the skeletal system, muscles, tendons and ligaments. All these elements are included in the new intelligent robotic system.

The exoskeleton is inexpensive, easy to use and adaptable to any patient. This system can help to relieve saturated rehabilitation units, with the consequent saving in the healthcare system.

Explore further: Researchers developing soft robotic glove for post-stroke hand rehabilitation

Related Stories

Researchers developing soft robotic glove for post-stroke hand rehabilitation

August 7, 2015
Initial rehabilitation therapy for many stroke victims may focus on regaining the ability to walk. But when hands also are affected, therapy focused only on the legs can leave hand muscles contracted, a condition that can ...

Recommended for you

New neurons in the adult brain are involved in sensory learning

February 23, 2018
Although we have known for several years that the adult brain can produce new neurons, many questions about the properties conferred by these adult-born neurons were left unanswered. What advantages could they offer that ...

Neuroscientists discover a brain signal that indicates whether speech has been understood

February 22, 2018
Neuroscientists from Trinity College Dublin and the University of Rochester have identified a specific brain signal associated with the conversion of speech into understanding. The signal is present when the listener has ...

Study in mice suggests personalized stem cell treatment may offer relief for multiple sclerosis

February 22, 2018
Scientists have shown in mice that skin cells re-programmed into brain stem cells, transplanted into the central nervous system, help reduce inflammation and may be able to help repair damage caused by multiple sclerosis ...

Nolan film 'Memento' reveals how the brain remembers and interprets events from clues

February 22, 2018
Key repeating moments in the film give viewers the information they need to understand the storyline. The scenes cause identical reactions in the viewer's brain. The results deepen our understanding of how the brain functions, ...

Biomarker, clues to possible therapy found in novel childhood neurogenetic disease

February 22, 2018
Researchers studying a rare genetic disorder that causes severe, progressive neurological problems in childhood have discovered insights into biological mechanisms that drive the disease, along with early clues that an amino ...

A look at the space between mouse brain cells

February 22, 2018
Between the brain's neurons and glial cells is a critical but understudied structure that's been called neuroscience's final frontier: the extracellular space. With a new imaging paradigm, scientists can now see into and ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.