New study finds hydration levels affect cardiovascular health

March 1, 2016 by Amy Schlesing

Mild dehydration can impair vascular function nearly as much as smoking a cigarette, according to a new study in the European Journal of Nutrition.

This study indicates that hydration levels – even in healthy, young males – play a role in the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Stavros Kavouras, associate professor and coordinator of the Exercise Science Program at the University of Arkansas, led the international team that published the study.

"You could be mildly dehydrated without knowing it while you have endothelial impairment similar to smoking a cigarette," Kavouras said. "The degree of dehydration when these changes occur is at less than 2 percent dehydration, which is around the threshold when people start feeling thirsty."

Endothelial function is the dilation and constriction of the endothelium, the inner lining of . It plays a critical role in . Atherosclerosis is the loss of flexibility in the blood vessels that leads to hardening of the arteries, a known contributor to .

This study is the first to find a connection between minor dehydration and negative endothelial function with impaired cardiovascular health in humans.

Kavouras and his team noted that the next step for the research team is to study this effect on patients of both genders with already compromised cardiovascular systems, such as patients of diabetes and/or cardiovascular diseases.

Explore further: Researcher finds color of urine to be valid gauge for hydration in children

More information: Giannis Arnaoutis et al. The effect of hypohydration on endothelial function in young healthy adults, European Journal of Nutrition (2016). DOI: 10.1007/s00394-016-1170-8

Related Stories

Researcher finds color of urine to be valid gauge for hydration in children

June 23, 2015
Athletes and the military have used color charts to track hydration levels for years, and a new study in the European Journal of Nutrition by a U of A researcher found the same method of self-assessment is effective for children.

Dehydration likely among young athletes, research finds

August 1, 2013
(Medical Xpress)—Even when young players have water available while practicing soccer, they still became dehydrated, a University of Arkansas researcher found in a field study in Greece. Stavros Kavouras, an assistant professor ...

Elderly with dementia, diabetes and kidney problems risk dehydration

November 11, 2015
One in every five older people living in UK care homes has dehydration, suggesting that they are not drinking enough to keep themselves healthy. Those with dementia, diabetes and kidney problems are at most risk of dehydration ...

Cocoa flavanols lower blood pressure and increase blood vessel function in healthy people

September 10, 2015
Two recently published studies in the journals Age and the British Journal of Nutrition (BJN) demonstrate that consuming cocoa flavanols improves cardiovascular function and lessens the burden on the heart that comes with ...

Does being dehydrated increase your pain perception and reduce your brain blood flow?

February 22, 2016
New research from the College of Health has shed light on the impact dehydration has on our perception of pain, and our blood pressure and brain blood flow response.

Blood vessels can actually get better with age

July 21, 2015
Although the causes of many age-related diseases remain unknown, oxidative stress is thought to be the main culprit. Oxidative stress has been linked to cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases including diabetes, hypertension ...

Recommended for you

Blowing smoke? E-cigarettes might help smokers quit

July 26, 2017
People who used e-cigarettes were more likely to kick the habit than those who didn't, a new study found.

Brain disease seen in most football players in large report

July 25, 2017
Research on 202 former football players found evidence of a brain disease linked to repeated head blows in nearly all of them, from athletes in the National Football League, college and even high school.

Safety of medical devices not often evaluated by sex, age, or race

July 25, 2017
Researchers at Yale and the University of California-San Francisco have found that few medical devices are analyzed to consider the influence of their users' sex, age, or race on safety and effectiveness.

Why you should consider more than looks when choosing a fitness tracker

July 25, 2017
A UNSW study of five popular physical activity monitors, including Fitbit and Jawbone models, has found their accuracy differs with the speed of activity, and where they are worn.

Dog walking could be key to ensuring activity in later life

July 24, 2017
A new study has shown that regularly walking a dog boosts levels of physical activity in older people, especially during the winter.

Study finds 275,000 calls to poison control centers for dietary supplement exposures from 2000 through 2012

July 24, 2017
U.S. Poison Control Centers receive a call every 24 minutes, on average, regarding dietary supplement exposures, according to a new study from the Center for Injury Research and Policy and the Central Ohio Poison Center, ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.